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June 16, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Talc

June 16, 2018
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
*****  Hey Folks, about to run out of Industrial Minerals.  I need fresh meat for new topics.  Continue with Rocks and Minerals?  Geologic Disasters?  Geologic Scenery?  Pick me a topic.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geology

Thanks,
Randall
We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with TALC or Soapstone.
Hardness = 1, the softest mineral, will scratch with finernail.
Talc or talcum is a clay mineral composed of hydrated magnesium silicate with the chemical formula H2Mg3(SiO3)4 or Mg3Si4O10(OH)2. In loose form, it is (in ratio with or without corn starch), one of the most widely used substances known as baby powder.
I use it daily.   I generally leave the diaper off?!

Talcum Powder

Talcum Power

Image result for Images of talc

Block of Talc

Public Domain
Talc is also used as food additive or in pharmaceutical products as a glidant
Talc is used in many industries, including paper making, plastic, paint and coatings, rubber, food, electric cable, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, and ceramics.

Green Talc

Image result for Images of talc

 

Our next industrial mineral challenge will be VERMICULITE.
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

R

Tourmaline, Round 2?, Sunday, June 10, 2018

June 10, 2018
Greetings and Welcome to the Daily Rock and Mineral Feed.  This will consist of a daily (well – not always) compilation of decent photos of interest.
 
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.

 

These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

Enjoy!

 
Randy
 
Wow!  Choices – Choices – Tourmaline Choices.
 

 

1.  Rubelite = Pink Tourmaline.
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Tourmaline var. Rubellite- Stewart Lithia Mine, CA
2.1 cm

2.  Liddicoatite Tourmaline
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Liddicoatite – Estatoby, Sahatana Valley, Antananarivo Prov., Madagascar |#Geology
*Photo : © awminerals
 

 

3.  Tourmaline Crystal
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Geology Wonders

Fantastic Tourmaline crystal from Sahatany Valley, Madagascar.
Photo by F. Picciani

4.  My Big Pink Tourmaline.
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Richard Nass Pink Tourmaline Crystal

5.  Nice Tourmaline.
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Tourmaline Delight

While Googling i found this amazing Display Tourmaline and couldn’t stop myself from sharing!!!!!!!!!

6.  Yep, more multi-colored tourmaline.  Something tells me it might be pricey$
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7.  Acceptable Tourmaline.
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The ‘Steamboat’ tourmaline. Photo by The Smithsonian Institution.

8.  Watermelon Tourmaline.  “Green on the outside and Red on the inside.”
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Watermelon tourmaline crystal, 4.5 cm, Brazil

9.  Awesome Tourmaline
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A nice Tourmaline from the Houston Museum of Natural Science

10.  Pink Tourmaline.
Our new tourmaline we like it

11.  Tourmaline Slices
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Tourmaline-
Santa Rosa Mine, Itambacuri, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
2.6 cm across.
A stunning multicolor Tourmaline slice from the famous Santa Rosa mine.

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A Watermelon Tourmaline that looks good enough too eat.This is such a beautiful gemstone don’t you think? Learn more: http://www.gemsociety.org/…/tourmaline-jewelry-and-gemston…/

12.  Nice Ice like Blue Tourmaline of Maine

June 9, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Sulfur

June 9, 2018
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:

We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with Sulfur or Brimstone.
Sulfur or sulphur is a chemical element with symbol S and atomic number 16. It is abundant, multivalent, and nonmetallic.
Sulfur is an essential element for all life, but almost always in the form of organosulfur compounds or metal sulfides.
Uses of sulfur include the making of sulfuric acid, detergents, fertilizers, fine chemicals, pesticides, fungicides, bactericides, furniture, and pharmaceuticals, just to name a few uses.
Negative impacts include acid rain, Hydrogen Sulfide and Sulfur dioxides from volcanoes and industrial processes.

Sulfur Crystals
 
Sulfur vat from which railroad cars are loaded, Freeport Sulphur Co., Hoskins Mound, Texas (1943)
 
 
Sulfur occurs in fumaroles such as this one in Vulcano, Italy
Brisk gOwn work

 

Effect of acid rain on a forest, Jizera Mountains, Czech Republic
LoveczOwn work

Lapis lazuli owes its blue color to a trisulfur radical anion (S 3)
From fr, uploaded by fr:User:Luna04 under GFDL.
 
Our next industrial mineral challenge will be TALC.
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

R

Tourmaline Tuesday, June 5, 2018

June 5, 2018
Greetings and Welcome to the Daily Rock and Mineral Feed.  This will consist of a daily (well – not always) compilation of decent photos of interest.
 
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.

 

These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

Enjoy!

 
1.  When La Is Multicolor and reprenant almost all the colors of the rainbow…
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2.  steamboat Tourmaline
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This raspberry-and mint-colored tourmaline—nicknamed the “Steamboat”—is one of the world’s finest and most valuable mineral specimens.
3.  Schorl = Black Tourmaline.
Image may contain: food
Albert Mcnair‎ . The Rockhound Connection.
Schorly you wanted to see some basic black tourmaline for tourmaline week. Black tourmaline (schorl) Hogg Mine, Lagrange, Georgia.
4. I’d like a whole box of those.
Image may contain: food
A stunning Tourmaline from the Pederneira mine in Minas Gerais, Brazil. The photo is by German photographer Malte Sickinger.
5.  Mult-Colored Toumaline.
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6.  Green Tourmaline
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Sharing a 7.2 gr Tourmaline.
Minas Gerais Brazil.
7.  More schorl for Cheryl, Black Tourmaline.
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A beauty of a Schorl xl from Minas Gerais Brazil.
Self collected circa 1982.
8.  Torumaline Tour
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What a fine cluster of classic Brazilian watermelon tourmaline!
FROM Sapo Mine, Ferruginha, Conselheiro Pena, Doce Valley, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Credit: DI Anton Watzl
 
 
 
9. 
Tourmaline Week is going to be colorful.
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ΚΑΛΗ ΣΥΝΕΧΕΙΑ
Good follow
10.  We are in for some Big Fun on Tourmaline Week
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Tourmaline from Pederneira Mine, Minas Gerais, Brazil Collection : Dexter G Morrison Photo: Ben Decamp
11.  Does this come in strawberry flavor?
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Amazing pink topped ,orange tourmaline ! Gorgeous!
Amazing geologist
12.  WHO broke my rock!!!?
Image may contain: one or more people, mountain, outdoor and nature
Tight fold Cretaceous-Tertiary shales of the Eastern North Slope, Alaska.

Sunday Daily Feed, June 3, 2018

June 4, 2018
Greetings and Welcome to the Daily Rock and Mineral Feed.  This will consist of a daily (well – not always) compilation of decent photos of interest.
 
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.

 

These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

Enjoy!

 
Randy
>    Way too many pretties for me to keep track of.
1.  What so you mean, I can only chose 1?
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Uncut yellow Diamonds. By nationaljeweler.com
2.  Classic fluorite cube.
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How would you describe the beauty of this specimen ?
Fluorite on Baryte .
Image : Mario Miglioli
3.  Neat fluorite.
Image may contain: food
Fluorite cubes with Calcite accenting. By exceptionalminerals.com
4.  Help, running out of blue and red colors. R
Image may contain: outdoor and food
14 hrs ·
Amazing Flower Azurite from Yangchun, China |#EarthBeauty
Photo : © sarahmagdalena
5.  More RED
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Rhodochrosite – Kalahari Manganese Field, Northern Cape Province, South Africa |#Geology
*Photo : © bonhams
6.  Mt Antero, CO?
Image may contain: food
13 hrs ·
Amazonite and Smoky Quartz. By mineralmasterpiece.com
7.  Corundum???, not tourmaline?
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Enjoy this Unusual Gorgeous Corundum from Umba River (Umba Valley), Tanga Region, Tanzania.
photo: James Elliott (FMI)
8.  If it is green tourmaline, it is good,
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Sharing a 7.2 gr Tourmaline.
Minas Gerais Brazil.
9.  More schorl for Cheryl.
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A beauty of a Schorl xl from Minas Gerais Brazil.
Self collected circa 1982.
10.  Schorl, this one if for you.
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Sharing a 18 pound Brazilian Black Tourmaline.

June 1, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Silica Sand

June 1, 2018
Image result for Bottom Bay beaches
Graduate School Research at Bottomless Bay, Barbados
 
 
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with Silica Sand or Tripoli.
Sand is a naturally occurring granular material composed of finely divided rock and mineral particles.
silica sand is composed of primarily (silicon dioxide, or SiO2), usually in the form of quartz.
Other types of sand include calcium carbonate.

 

Silica sand suitable for making concrete is in high demand.  Also used in fracking of wells.
Sand dunes in the Idehan Ubari, Libya.
by Luca Galuzzi
 
Close-up (1×1 cm) of sand from the Gobi Desert, Mongolia.
Siim SeppOwn work
 
Heavy minerals (dark) in a quartz beach sand (Chennai, India).
Photograph taken by Mark A. Wilson (Department of Geology, The College of Wooster).
 
 
Sand from Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park, Utah. These are grains of quartz with a hematite coating providing the orange color.
Wilson44691Own work
 
 
Sand from Pismo Beach, California. Components are primarily quartz, chert, igneous rock and shell fragments.
 
 
Close up of black volcanic sand from Perissa, Santorini, Greece
ZureksOwn work
 
 
Sand sorting tower at a gravel pit.
Photograph © Andrew Dunn, 24 September 2005.
 
 
Barbados Beaches.  “Graduate School Research Site”
Image result for Bottom Bay beaches
Our next industrial mineral challenge will be Sulfur.
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

R

Thursday Daily Feed, May 31, 2018

June 1, 2018
Greetings and Welcome to the Daily Rock and Mineral Feed.  This will consist of a daily (well – not always) compilation of decent photos of interest.
 
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.

 

These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

Enjoy!

 
Randy
1.  Crystal of Blue Azurite. Azurite is a soft, deep blue copper mineral produced by weathering of copper ore deposits. Cu3(CO3)2(OH)2. H= 3.5 to 4. R
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2.  Eeeeek! Pink Rubies. R
Image may contain: food
Vibrant pink ruby crystals on matrix FROM Jegdalek, Konar Prov., Afghanistan.  Photo: Mineral Masterpiece
3.  Tanzanite.  Gretchen needs one or two?
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I love this exquisite blue Tanzanite – rough (unpolished/ uncut) Origin: Merelani hills mine, Tanzania
4.  Oh! Just another one of those colored tourmalines. R
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Liddicoatite. By saphiraminerals.com
5.  New York Trilobite with soft parts preserved, awesome.R
6.  Oh!  The usual aquamarine beryl crystals.
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Aquamarine with Schorl inclusions. By saphiraminerals.com
7.  I found it, please send home.
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Beautiful Glassy Crystals of Egg Malachite.
8.  Green Peridot, August Birthstone.
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PERIDOT, a form of OLIVINE is aka CHRYSOLITE
Chemical formula: (Mg, Fe)₂SiO₄.
FUN FACTS ABOUT MY (tied for 1st) FAVORITE MINERAL
Primary Birthstone of August
Period is usually buried deep under igneous rocks, especially in areas where there have been volcanic eruptions. Peridot crystals have also come from pallasite meteorites.
The best locales for finding decent sized pieces of peridot are around the San Carlos Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona. It is also found in Afghanistan, Australia, Brazil, China, Egypt, Kashmir, Kenya, Mexico, Myanmar, Norway, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Sri Lanka and Tanzania.
Smaller pieces that are lighter in color have been found in other areas in the U.S. including Arkansas, Arizona, Hawaii, Nevada and New Mexico.
The most beautiful peridot comes from the border area between Pakistan and Afghanistan.
Where the “peridot” name came from is unclear.
The oldest belief is that it comes from the Arabic word “faridat” which means “gem.”
It could be an alteration of the Anglo–Norman “pedoretés” (classical Latin pæderot) which is a kind of opal.
Because of its close association with volcanoes, many Hawaiians believe that peridot symbolizes the tears of Hele, their goddess of fire and volcanoes.
Peridot’s energy embodies love, truth, faithfulness and loyalty and suppresses ego and jealousy. It is believed to ward off evil spirits, making relationships and marriages more successful.
The The Egyptians called peridot the “‘gems of the sun”. During that period, Peridot was mined only from the Egyptian island of Topazios. The Egyptians would mine only at night as they believed that the gemstone could not easily be seen in daylight.
The Romans called it the ‘Evening Emerald’ because it did not darken at night unlike most emeralds.
There is a lot more info on this incredible mineral which I can’t share here.
I will only add that peridot is one of the few minerals that only wears one color…..green. 💚💚
9.  Unique Gold Crystals.
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Close up of a great crystalline growth of Round Mountain gold. I love to show this when I am a docent at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas. People think gold is in nuggets or flakes only.
A zurite & Malachite – Anhui Province, China
Image may contain: outdoor
11.  Fluorite.  Yep! Send me a dozen. R
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Fluorite – mim 1434 – USA
CaF2
Minerva #1 Mine, Cave in Rock, Hardin County, Illinois
Previous collection: Ross C. Lillie, USA
Fluorite cube, violet on the inside and blue on the outside, with an altered yellow fluorite at the base and a corolla of small crystals of light fluorite with black traces of hydrocarbons in the interstices. The ensemble is intact, sharp and very shiny.
12.  Looks like a keeper to me.  R
Image may contain: flower and food
Elbait Green Tourmaline From Brazil
Photo: Charlotte Noorjamal Anderson