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February 10, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Kyanite

February 10, 2018
https://geology.com/minerals/photos/kyanite.jpg
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:

 
Admin:  Let me know if you wish to continue to be on this email distribution list.  After 1-month, if I don’t hear from you, I will remove you.  Thanks, Randall Week 4
 
 
This week’s industrial minerals are Kyanite / Sillimanite / Andalusite.

Kyanite is a typically blue silicate mineral, commonly found in aluminium-rich metamorphic pegmatites and/or sedimentary rock. Kyanite in metamorphic rocks generally indicates pressures higher than four kilobars.

USESKyanite is used primarily in refractory and ceramic products, including porcelain plumbing and dishware. It is also used in electronics, electrical insulators and abrasives.
Kyanite is one of the index minerals that are used to estimate the temperature, depth, and pressure at which a rock undergoes metamorphism.
Kyanite crystals (7cm long)
Kyanite crystals.jpg
User:AelwynSelf made picture

 

Deep blue kyanite
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/48/Kyanite.JPG
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Sillimanite is an aluminosilicatemineral with the chemical formula Al2SiO5.
Natural sillimanite rocks cut into the required shape and size are used mainly in glass industries. Sillimanite is the best raw material for the manufacture of high alumina refractories or 55-60% alumina bricks.
Sillimanite Locality: Orissa, India (Locality at mindat.org) Size: thumbnail, 2.7 x 2.1 x 0.9 cm Sillimanite (huge gem xl)
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/Sillimanite-k302a.jpg
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0
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Andalusite is an aluminiumnesosilicatemineral with the chemical formula Al2SiO5.
Andalusite is an aluminium compound with high heat resistance used in furnaces, kilns and other industrial processes.
Andalusite Locality : Lüsens valley, Sellrain valley, North Tyrol, Tyrol, Austria Size : 7.4×6.2cm
AndalousiteTyrol.jpg
Didier DescouensOwn work
 

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Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
_______________________________________________________________
 
“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”

_____________________________________________________________

 

We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with limestone and dolomite.
 
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 
R

Wednesday Daily Feed, February 7, 2018

February 8, 2018
Greetings and Welcome to the Daily Rock and Mineral Feed.  This will consist of a daily (well – not always) compilation of around 10 decent photos of interest.
 
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.

These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

 

Enjoy!
 
Randy
 

Admin:  Anyone who wants off or on this distribution list just let me know and either you will be removed or added. R

1.  Anyone you know?
Image may contain: 1 person, text

2.  I think this is a Fantastic Condor Agate. it is unusual too with that cool Amethyst band. Those Fractures are healed with red and look odd also going against the Grain .
No automatic alt text available.
Richard Nass shared his post to the group: The Rockhound Connection.

3.  El sueco agate with amazing banding and killer parallax
No automatic alt text available.

4.  Lake Superior Agate
Image may contain: food

5.  Blue Salt. Blue color is probably caused by long exposure to low level radioactivity. R
No automatic alt text available.

6.  Sold to a new home. Opalized ammonite. R
No automatic alt text available.

7.
No automatic alt text available.

8.  “Pele’s Hair,”
Pele’s hair is a form of lava. It is named after Pele, the Hawaiian goddess of volcanoes. It can be defined as volcanic glass fibers or thin strands of volcanic glass.[1] The strands are formed through the stretching of molten basaltic glass from lava, usually from lava fountains, lava cascades, and vigorous lava flows.”  Wikipedia

9.  Native silver wire spiral
The shapes of native metals never cease to amaze me, and this lovely 1.4 x 1 x .9 cm Celtic knotwork reminds me of some of my favourite styles of historical jewellery, though wrought by nature rather than man.
No automatic alt text available.
Image credit: Joe Budd/Rob Lavinsky/iRocks.com

10.  One of My Favorites. R
Image may contain: text
Gouda news! January 20 is Cheese Lovers Day!

January 28, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Kaolin

January 27, 2018
Kaolinite Mineral
Wolkem India Limited, Swaroop Sagar, Udaipur
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:

 
This week’s industrial mineral is Kaolin (Kaolinite).
 

“Kaolinite /ˈkəlɪˌnt/[4][5] is a clay mineral, part of the group of industrial minerals, with the chemical composition Al2Si2O5(OH)4.  Rocks that are rich in kaolinite are known as kaolin /ˈkəlɪn/ or china clay.[7]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaolinite

USES
The main use of the mineral kaolinite (about 50% of the time) is the production of paper; its use ensures the gloss on some grades of coated paper.[47]
Kaolin is used (or was used in the past):

Kaolinite sample from Twiggs County, Georgia, USA. This sample is from the Cretaceous rocks of Georgia, where it occurs as lenses in paleodeltaic sands.
260px

https://www.911metallurgist.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/Kaolinite-clay.jpg

Electron Microscope Image of Kaolinite.
https://i0.wp.com/c8.alamy.com/comp/DTFM8N/kaolinite-DTFM8N.jpg
As I stated earlier, not very photogenic, but very important to our modern life.
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Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
_______________________________________________________________
 
“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”

_____________________________________________________________


We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with


 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

R

January 21, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Halite

January 20, 2018
https://www.esci.umn.edu/courses/1001/minerals/images/halite.jpg
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
 
Admin:  Let me know if you wish to continue to be on this email distribution list.  After 1-month, if I don’t hear from you, I will remove you.  Thanks, Randall
 

This week’s industrial mineral is Halite or Salt.
 

Halite ( /ˈhælt/ or /ˈhlt/),[4] commonly known as rock salt, is a type of salt, the mineral (natural) form of sodium chloride (NaCl).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halite

Uses

Halite is often used both residentially and municipally for managing ice. Because brine (a solution of water and salt) has a lower freezing point than pure water, putting salt or saltwater on ice that is near 0 °C (32 °F) will cause it to melt. (This effect is called freezing-point depression.) It is common for homeowners in cold climates to spread salt on their sidewalks and driveways after a snow storm to melt the ice. It is not necessary to use so much salt that the ice is completely melted; rather, a small amount of salt will weaken the ice so that it can be easily removed by other means. Also, many cities will spread a mixture of sand and salt on roads during and after a snowstorm to improve traction. In addition to de-icing, rock salt is occasionally used in agriculture. An example of this would be inducing salt stress to suppress the growth of annual meadow grass in turf production.
Salt is also used extensively in cooking as a flavor enhancer and to cure a wide variety of foods such as bacon and fish.[7] Larger pieces can be ground in a salt mill or dusted over food from a shaker as finishing salt.
Some cultures, especially in Africa, prefer a wide variety of different rock salts for different dishes. Pure salt is avoided as particular colors of salt indicates the presence of different impurities. Many recipes call for particular kinds of rock salt, and imported pure salt often has impurities added to adapt to local tastes.[8]
Salt domes are vertical diapirs or pipe-like masses of salt that have been essentially “squeezed up” from underlying salt beds by mobilization due to the weight of overlying rock. Salt domes contain anhydrite, gypsum, and native sulfur, in addition to halite and sylvite. They are common along the Gulf coasts of Texas and Louisiana and are often associated with petroleum deposits.

Halit (NaCl) – Kopalnia soli Wieliczka, Polska.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/89/Halit_%28NaCl%29_-_Kopalnia_soli_Wieliczka%2C_Polska.jpg/1280px-Halit_%28NaCl%29_-_Kopalnia_soli_Wieliczka%2C_Polska.jpg
Halit (NaCl) – Kopalnia soli Wieliczka, Polska.
 

 

Halite cubes from the Stassfurt Potash deposit, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany (size: 6.7 × 1.9 × 1.7 cm)
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0
Halite Locality: Stassfurt, Stassfurt Potash deposit, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany (Locality at mindat.org) Size: 6.7 x 1.9 x 1.7 cm. A stunning halite specimen of water-clear, stacked echelon and offset cubes. This beautiful specimen is complete-all-around and is pristine. The side views remind me of art by the famed mathematical artist, M.C. Escher. Ex. Carl Turner Collection. From the famed salt deposits at Stassfurt, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany.

Unusual halite crystals from Faiyum, Egypt
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ab/Halite-Egypt.jpg
Halite from Fayum, Egypt. Collected 1989 by Wm. Revell Phillips Mineral collection of Brigham Young University Department of Geology, Provo, Utah. Photograph by Andrew Silver. No BYU index, NaCl.

Sharp halite crystals that have this green color from inclusions of malachite
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0
Halite Locality: Lubin, Lubin District, Legnica, Lower Silesia (Dolnośląskie), Poland (Locality at mindat.org) Size: 10.0 x 8.5 x 5.1 cm. A fine cabinet specimen of sharp halite crystals from Poland that have this amazingly pretty green color from inclusions of malachite the halites picked up as they grew. You would swear this is a specimen of green fluorite from some new locality, unless you were to lick it and realize that it is salt (but do not lick it – natural halite specimens can harbor bacteria).

Large natural crystal of halite, showing cubic cleavage breaks
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7f/HALIT_X_NaCl_Natriumchlorid_W%C3%9CRFEL_KUBUS_50P.jpg
Halit (Kluftmineralisation) – Würfelförmiger Kristall mit einer Kantenlänge von 20 mm.

Pink color halite on a matrix covered with minute nahcolite
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a0/Halite-Nahcolite-60710.jpg
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0
Halite, Nahcolite Locality: Searles Lake, San Bernardino County, California, USA (Locality at mindat.org) This is one of the largest and finest specimens we acquired from this find! Okay, halite is salt, but for one thing, it is just as legitimate a mineral as any other, even if you CAN eat it (not this though – it contains bacteria so dont lick it!). This batch of gorgeous halite specimens was mined recently in California, and they are REALLY distinctive. Look at the amazingly fine structure of the crystals and beautiful bright pink color! But more than that, they have this wonderful contrast with a uniquely new matrix covered with minute nahcolite . Bottom line: it is just a plain stunningly pretty mineral specimen from a recent find; I bought ALL OF THEM THAT WERE AVAILABLE from the one contact who brought them to a show last year in California. NOTE that they are sensitive to humidity. 13.0 x 11.4 x 5.6cm
 
 

 

Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0
Halite Locality: PCS mine, Rocanville, Saskatchewan, Canada (Locality at mindat.org) This is a really impressive, cityscape-like specimen of naturally crystallized halite. It is a floater, complete and well-formed all around! The agreegate growth is striking, in person, and it is an excellent example of the natural occurrence of what is more fondly known to the masses as “table salt,” and thus makes a good conversation piece 16.8 x 14.9 x 5.2 cm

Exquisite Blue Halite, $4,500.
https://store.finemineralia.com/assets/images/DCO17-BigHalite-11.jpg
The blue halite would have formed first – tens of millions of years ago. The surrounding Sylvite mineral contains radioactive Potassium 40 which has an incredibly long half-life of 1 billion years. This means the radiation is so low that geiger counters have a hard time even picking it up. Potassium 40 is also found in bananas, but the radiation is so low that it’s harmless to ingest. That being said, over tens of millions of years this low radioactivity takes its toll on the halite, effectively altering the crystal lattice which gives it its blue color. The blue is not chemical – it’s just a result of radiation on regular old table salt. The clear halite grew in more recently, and it hasn’t had time to be turned blue by the potassium in the Sylvite.

Giant Halite Cubes in Underground Salt Mine
https://i.imgur.com/nr5vszk.jpg
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Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
_______________________________________________________________
 
“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”

_____________________________________________________________


We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with Halite.
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

R

January 14, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Gypsum

January 13, 2018
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
 
 
This week’s industrial mineral is Gypsum.
 

 

Gypsum is a soft sulfate mineral composed of calcium sulfate dihydrate, with the chemical formula CaSO4·2H2O.[3]
It is widely mined and is used as a fertilizer, and as the main constituent in many forms of plaster, blackboard chalk and wallboard.
A massive fine-grained white or lightly tinted variety of gypsum, called alabaster, has been used for sculpture by many cultures including Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Ancient Rome, the Byzantine Empire and the Nottingham alabasters of Medieval England.
Mohs scale of mineral hardness, based on scratch hardness comparison, defines hardness value 2 as gypsum.
It forms as an evaporite mineral and as a hydration product of anhydrite.

Crystal varieties

Main article: Selenite (mineral)
Gypsum occurs in nature as flattened and often twinned crystals, and transparent, cleavable masses called selenite.
Selenite may also occur in a silky, fibrous form, in which case it is commonly called “satin spar”. Finally, it may also be granular or quite compact. In hand-sized samples, it can be anywhere from transparent to opaque. A very fine-grained white or lightly tinted variety of gypsum, called alabaster, is prized for ornamental work of various sorts. In arid areas, gypsum can occur in a flower-like form, typically opaque, with embedded sand grains called desert rose. It also forms some of the largest crystals found in nature, up to 12 m (39 ft) long, in the form of selenite.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gypsum#cite_note-8

1.  Uplighter lamp, white and brown Italian alabaster, base diameter 13 cm (20th century)

Lamp made from Italian alabaster. The base is 5 inches (13 cm) in diameter. Taken in England by Adrian Pingstone in May 2003 and released to the public domain.

2.    Gypsum crystals in the Cave of the Crystals in Mexico. Note person for scale

Alexander Van DriesscheGaianauta received this from Alexander Van Driessche via Email.
Gypsum crystals of the Naica cave. Note person for scale. Author: Alexander Van Driessche

3.    Veins of gypsum in Caprock Canyons State Park, Texas

Fredlyfish4Own work
Gypsum layers in a wash that have been exposed by erosion in Caprock Canyons State Park, Texas.

4.Golden gypsum crystals from Winnipeg

Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0
Gypsum (Var.: Gypsum) Locality: Red River Floodway, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada (Locality at mindat.org) On a recent trip to Winnipeg, we picked up 10 very unusual specimens of different sorts from the guy who mines them in the clay of the Red River Floodway. This one has the familiar ball shape, but instead of the normally golden-sherry color, the crystals are gem-clear. A single sharp, gemmy crystal rises in one place to crown the specimen. 4 x 2.8 x 2.8 cm

5.    Unusual selenite gypsum from the Red River, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0
Gypsum (Var.: Gypsum) Locality: Red River Floodway, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada (Locality at mindat.org) Size: 5.2 x 3.4 x 2.9 cm. These strange floater balls of gypsum crystals formed deep in clay beds in the floodway of the Red River, and have been mined there (with a lot of labor) since the 60s. They are truly beautiful, particularly when you have just one or two twinned crystals rising from the rest of the ball in isolation, as here.

6.    Gypsum sand from White Sands National Monument, New Mexico

Wilson44691Own work
Wilson44691Own work
Gypsum sand from White Sands National Monument, New Mexico. Photograph by Mark A. Wilson (Department of Geology, The College of Wooster).

7.    Green gypsum crystals from Pernatty Lagoon, Mt Gunson, South Australia – its green color is due to presence of copper ions.

Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0
Gypsum (Var.: Gypsum) Locality: Pernatty Lagoon, Mt Gunson, Stuart Shelf area, Andamooka Ranges – Lake Torrens area, South Australia, Australia (Locality at mindat.org) Okay, this specimen was very difficult to shoot, so PLEASE NOTE that the interior crystals are NOT deep green but actually the lighter green of the smaller photo. What a beautiful specimen this is, an intact pocket of rounded crystal blooms! The back was sawn flat to cut this pocket out of the matrix of massive gypsum. 9.4 x 7.2 x 3.9 cm

8.    Desert roses (Gypsum) Locality : Southern Tunisia Size : 47 × 33 cm.

Didier DescouensOwn work

9.    gypsum var. selenite : Santa Eulalia District, Mun. de Aquiles Serdán, Chihuahua, Mexico

Gypse-sélénite 3.jpeg
Parent GéryOwn work
 
 
 

10.    Gypsum flowers, Bou Azer East deposit, Bou Azer District, Tazenakht, Ouarzazate Province, Souss-Massa-Draâ Region, Morocco

Parent GéryOwn work
gypsum var. selenite, ankerite : Bou Azer East deposit, Bou Azer, Bou Azer District (Bou Azzer District), Tazenakht, Ouarzazate Province, Souss-Massa-Draâ Region, Morocco
_________________________________________________________
Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
_______________________________________________________________
 
“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”

_____________________________________________________________

 

We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with Halite.
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

 

R

Wednesday Daily Feed, January 3 2018 — Amber

January 4, 2018
Greetings and Welcome to the Daily Rock and Mineral Feed.  This will consist of a daily (well – not always) compilation of around 10 decent photos of interest.
 
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.

Pinterest, 572 7th Street · San Francisco CA, 94103

These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

 

Enjoy!
 
Randy
 

Admin:  Anyone who wants off or on this distribution list just let me know and either you will be removed or added. R

Amber is fossilized tree resin, which has been appreciated for its color and natural beauty since Neolithic times.[2] Much valued from antiquity to the present as a gemstone, amber is made into a variety of decorative objects.[3] Amber is used in jewelry. It has also been used as a healing agent in folk medicine.

1.    Bumblebee in Amber
This prehistoric Honey Bee is preserved eternally in this Amber  #Gemstones #Amber #Fossils
Saved from gemcollection.com

2.   Snake in Amber
amber
Saved from facebook.com

3.   An ant inside Baltic amber
Anders L. Damgaard – www.amber-inclusions.dk

4.    A Mosquito in Amber.
By Didier Desouens – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=12429826

5.    Unpolished amber stones
uploaded with permission from User Lanzi by Ra’ike on de.wikipedia

6.    Unique colors of Baltic amber. Polished stones.
Homik8 Michal KosiorOwn work
7.    Amber from Bitterfeld, gedanite
Roland FuhrmannOwn work
 
 
8.   Blue amber from Dominican Republic
Blue amber from Dominican Republic
 
 
9.    Amber Stone Ear Rings.
Image result for amber jewelry images
10.   Cherry Amber Faceted Bead Graduated Long Deco Necklace
Cherry Amber Faceted Bead Graduated Long Deco Necklace
Saved from
thevintagevillage.com

Tuesday Daily Feed, January 2 2018

January 2, 2018
Greetings and Welcome to the Daily Rock and Mineral Feed.  This will consist of a daily (well – not always) compilation of around 10 decent photos of interest.
 
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.

Pinterest, 572 7th Street · San Francisco CA, 94103

These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

 

Enjoy!
 
Randy
 

 1.    Beryl – Morganite

MORGANITE: promotes abundance of the heart and prosperity of love. It assists in connecting with Divine Love and angelic energies. It releases unhealthy emotional patterns, helps develop trust, a sense of joy, and inner strength.
morganite – pink to peach – colored by manganese (pink) and iron (peach.  cs.cmu.edu

 2.    Beryl – Aquamarine and Schorl, Black Tourmaline.

aquamarine with black tourmaline and albite

 3. Supposedly Raw obsidian (natural volcanic glass)

https://i.pinimg.com/736x/29/db/6d/29db6d244dd182627d9e3c816dfe0a2c.jpg

4.    Beryl.  Emerald and Diamond Broach
No automatic alt text available.

AnythingEverything

Gorgeous Emerald, ruby and diamond brooch, late 19th century.
Can you find the Ruby? 🙂
Additional Details https://goo.gl/X4DeT1

 5.  Copper Minerals

Azurite and Malachite – Sha Wan La Ji, Wan Xiang, Laos

 6.    Yep! That will do. R

Corundum (Aluminum Oxide).  Sapphire Crystal and Gemstone.
No automatic alt text available.

 7.    Yep! Looks banded to me. Minnesota. R

No automatic alt text available.

 8.    Red Tourmaline

No automatic alt text available.
Come see the gallery hosted by myself and @cutedgegems tomorrow at Shine! (boulder, co) :: 1pm-8pm with many live painters, gems, jewelry, and glass Art

9.   West Virginia
Image may contain: tree, snow, sky, plant, outdoor and nature
Folio Rewind: February 18, 2016 – “Appalachian Living”
Brian K. Simpson
10.   Winter?

https://www.facebook.com/Shareeit/videos/822453747947035/?hc_ref=ARSleY2amXsU3oqbwNeTokcD6hCFx90HLXKpe8zutM9QLZiFP5c33fPiTwyrMG7v95k&pnref=story