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April 22, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Perlite

April 22, 2018

Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:

 

We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with Perlite.

Perlite is an amorphousvolcanic glass that has a relatively high water content, typically formed by the hydration of obsidian. It occurs naturally and has the unusual property of greatly expanding when heated sufficiently. It is an industrial mineral and a commercial product useful for its low density after processing.

Perlite boulders with fireweed in foreground

RG JohnssonU.S. National Park Service, Yellowstone Slide Files, Geology Images/Volcanic – Igneous, #02316

Expanded perlite

PerliteUSGOV.jpg

Image result for perlite images

https://inspectapedia.com/insulation/Perlite_Insulation.php

Image result for perlite images

https://www.bunnings.com.au/brunnings-5l-perlite-potting-mix_p3010203

Enjoy the adventure!

 

Thanks,

 

R

Our next industrial mineral challenge will be phosphates.

 

 

April7, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Olivine

April 8, 2018
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
This week’s industrial mineral is Olivine.

 

What is Olivine?

Olivine is the name of a group of rock-forming minerals that are typically found in mafic and ultramafic igneous rocks such as basalt, gabbro, dunite, diabase, and peridotite. They are usually green in color and have compositions that typically range between Mg2SiO4 and Fe2SiO4. Many people are familiar with olivine because it is the mineral of a very popular green gemstone known as peridot.

The mineral olivine ( /ˈɒlɪˌvn/) is a magnesium iron silicate with the formula (Mg2+, Fe2+)2SiO4.

Olivine Locality: Naran-Kagan Valley, Kohistan District, North-West Frontier Province, Pakistan (Locality at mindat.org) Size: miniature, 3.4 x 2.5 x 1.9 cm (28 grams) Peridot This is from a new find of peridots at this now-classic locality which has produced the world’s best crystals of the species by far. The color is just a REALLY JUICY LIMEY-GREEN COLOR the likes of which you seldom see. The crystal is very gemmy and translucent to transparent throughout, as well, so it is better in person than the photos indicate. I know these have been comin gout for years now, but THIS type is different – just a bit more vibrant in color, overall, and with great terminations. This was one of the few miniatures I picked up for a mix of form and color quality. There are a few very insignificant dings, and one contact on the left side. It is otherwise complete all around.

Olivine-gem7-10a.jpg
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0
 

Translucent olivine is sometimes used as a gemstone called peridot (péridot, the French word for olivine). It is also called chrysolite (or chrysolithe, from the Greek words for gold and stone). Some of the finest gem-quality olivine has been obtained from a body of mantle rocks on Zabargad Island in the Red Sea.

Olivine gemstone

Olivine gemstone: The gemstone known as peridot is a variety of olivine. These two faceted stones are nice specimens of yellowish green peridot. The gem on the left is a 1.83 carat cushion cut peridot of about 8 x 6 millimeters from Myanmar. The gem on the right is a 1.96 carat cushion checkerboard cut peridot of about 10 x 8 millimeters from China. Photo copyright Geology.com.

Olivine in pallasite

Olivine in pallasite: A part slice of the Esquel pallasite from Chubut, Argentina. The large, colorful, oblong olivine crystals are typical of this meteorite. Note the way in which crystals near the rough (natural) edge have turned orange and yellow due to terrestrial weathering, while the crystals nearer to the center of the original mass have retained their true olive green color. Photograph by Geoffrey Notkin, copyright Aerolite Meteorites, used with permission.

 

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>    Since olivine makes up the mantle, it is used to determine depth of burial, thus temperature and pressure.
Olivine grains which eroded from lava on Papakolea Beach, Hawaii

 

Wilson44691Own work
 
Uses:

Olivine is a used as a substitute for dolomite in steel works.[34] Olivine is also used to tap blast furnaces in the steel industry, acting as a plug, removed in each steel run.[citation needed]
The aluminium foundry industry uses olivine sand to cast objects in aluminium. Olivine sand requires less water than silica sands while still holding the mold together during handling and pouring of the metal. Less water means less gas (steam) to vent from the mold as metal is poured into the mold.[35]
In Finland, olivine is marketed as an ideal rock for sauna stoves because of its comparatively high density and resistance to weathering under repeated heating and cooling.
 
{Sounds like a nice christmas present!} R
 
 
We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zeolites.
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

March 31, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Novaculite

April 1, 2018
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:

This week’s industrial mineral is Novaculite.

Novaculite, also called Arkansas Stone, is a microcrystalline to cryptocrystalline rock type that consists of silica in the form of chert or flint.
It is used in the production of sharpening stones.
 
Use
Because novaculite is very hard and dense, it has been mined since prehistoric times, first for use as arrow and spear points, and later to make sharpening stones. Novaculite-rich sharpening stones from Arkansas are called Arkansas stones;[5] stones produced in the Ottoman empire (Syria, Lebanon, and Israel) were called Turkey stones;[3] and novaculite stones were also produced in Japan.[3]
The weathered upper strata of Arkansas novaculite, known as tripoli or “rotten stone”, are rich in silica and have found a niche market as a performance additive or filler in the coatings, adhesives, sealants, and elastomer industries. Tripoli is mined just east of Hot Springs, Arkansas by the Malvern Minerals Company.[6]

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Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
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“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”

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We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with Olivine.
 
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

 

R

March 17, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Natron

March 26, 2018
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:

 
This week’s industrial mineral is Natron.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_mineral

>    Wow!  Lot more pictures (X10), The Good-The Bad-The Ugly, than I would have thought.

Natron is a naturally occurring mixture of sodium carbonate decahydrate (Na2CO3·10H2O, a kind of soda ash) and around 17% sodium bicarbonate (also called baking soda, NaHCO3) along with small quantities of sodium chloride and sodium sulfate.

Decline in Use:
Most of natron’s uses both in the home and by industry were gradually replaced with closely related sodium compounds and minerals. Natron’s detergent properties are now commercially supplied by soda ash (pure sodium carbonate), the mixture’s chief compound ingredient, along with other chemicals. Soda ash also replaced natron in glass-making. Some of its ancient household roles are also now filled by ordinary baking soda, natron’s other meaningful ingredient.

Natron deposits in the Era Kohor crater in the Tibesti Mountains, Chad
Stefan ThüngenOwn work
 

 

A faience vase fabricated in part from natron, dating to the New Kingdom of Egypt (ca. 1450-1350 BC).


Natron: Na2CO3·10(H2O)

Large Natron Image

Modern Hi Tech Delivery.
<strong>Natron</strong> being unloaded along the eastern shore of Lake Chad near Baga Sola, Chad.
Natron being unloaded along the eastern shore of Lake Chad near Baga Sola, Chad.© Jacques Jangoux/Peter Arnold, Inc.

Tanzania’s Lake Natron has a killer reputation. Said to turn local wildlife to stone, its bright red waters certainly seem to signal danger. But in fact, the concentration of harmful chemicals in this alkaline lake supports a rich ecosystem. The water of Lake Natron reaches scalding temperatures of more than 40°C (104°F).
Travel: 10 amazing pics of Lake Natron, the Mummifying Blood Waters of Tanzania  (Lake That Turns Animals to Stone)

Natron, for use with food.

Related image

Natron for Sale.  e-rocks Mineral Auctions.
Natron

Lake Natron, TanzaniaLake Natron, Tanzania

Mummified Flamingo in Lake Natron
© Nick Brandt. Courtesy of Edwynn Houk Gallery, NY

 

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Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
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“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”

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We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with Nahcolite.
 
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

 

R

March 24, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Nahcolite

March 25, 2018
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
Pass me another one of those Nahcolite biscuits and the butter.  Please
 
Image result
>    See, I was a budding geologist and didn’t even know it.  But I like mine with either Blackburn’s Cane Syrup, or Yellow Label Syrup, or Golden Eagle (Fayette, AL)

This week’s industrial mineral is Nahcolite.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nahcolite

Nahcolite is a soft, colourless or white carbonate mineral with the composition of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) also called thermokalite.
Nahcolite is the natural mineral most familiar to us as Sodium Bicarbonate or Sodium Hydrogen Carbonate or (most commonly) Baking Soda. Yes, there’s probably a box of nahcolite in your pantry, possibly another in your refrigerator.
Nahcolite, as ordinary baking soda, is used to make cookies, cakes, biscuits, and similar pastries “rise” during baking. In the presence of an acid, it easily decomposes into carbon dioxide and a sodium salt of that acid, and the trapped bubbles provide the textures we enjoy in those foods. Note that “baking powder” is a simple mixture of baking soda and a dry acid such as cream of tartar, often with a starch added to provide bulk.
It occurs as a hot spring and saline lake precipitate or efflorescence; in differentiated alkalic massifs; in fluid inclusions as a daughter mineral phase and in evaporite deposits.  in the U. S. from Searles Lake, San Bernardino County, California; in the Green River Formation, Colorado and Utah; in the Tincalayu deposit,

Nahcolite Locality: California, USA (Locality at mindat.org) An exceptional large specimen with crystals to 2 cm! Old material not readily obtainable, even in local collections…In fact, I can honestly say that I haven’t even SEEN one for sale in the 8 years I have lived in Southern California. These were collected several decades ago. 9.5 x 8 x 4 cm
Nahcolite-20212.jpg
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Nahcolite deposition model

 

Ronald C. Johnson, Tracey J. Mercier, Michael E. Brownfield, and Jesse G. SelfAssessment of In-Place Oil Shale Resources in

Nahcolite
Nahcolite

https://e-rocks.com/item/shs28952/nahcolite

Halite – Nahcolite
Image result for Nahcolite

Halite on Nahcolite
Halite on Nahcolite from Searles Lake, San Bernardino Co., California [db_pics/pics/na800a.jpg]

100 pounds of Sodium Bicarbonate
Related image

http://www.cqconcepts.com/product/sodium-bicarbonate-100-lbs/

http://www.naturalsoda.com/AboutUs.aspx

 

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Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
_______________________________________________________________
 
“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”

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We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with Novaculite.
 
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

 

R

February 10, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Kyanite

February 10, 2018
https://geology.com/minerals/photos/kyanite.jpg
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:

 
Admin:  Let me know if you wish to continue to be on this email distribution list.  After 1-month, if I don’t hear from you, I will remove you.  Thanks, Randall Week 4
 
 
This week’s industrial minerals are Kyanite / Sillimanite / Andalusite.

Kyanite is a typically blue silicate mineral, commonly found in aluminium-rich metamorphic pegmatites and/or sedimentary rock. Kyanite in metamorphic rocks generally indicates pressures higher than four kilobars.

USESKyanite is used primarily in refractory and ceramic products, including porcelain plumbing and dishware. It is also used in electronics, electrical insulators and abrasives.
Kyanite is one of the index minerals that are used to estimate the temperature, depth, and pressure at which a rock undergoes metamorphism.
Kyanite crystals (7cm long)
Kyanite crystals.jpg
User:AelwynSelf made picture

 

Deep blue kyanite
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/48/Kyanite.JPG
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Sillimanite is an aluminosilicatemineral with the chemical formula Al2SiO5.
Natural sillimanite rocks cut into the required shape and size are used mainly in glass industries. Sillimanite is the best raw material for the manufacture of high alumina refractories or 55-60% alumina bricks.
Sillimanite Locality: Orissa, India (Locality at mindat.org) Size: thumbnail, 2.7 x 2.1 x 0.9 cm Sillimanite (huge gem xl)
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/Sillimanite-k302a.jpg
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0
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Andalusite is an aluminiumnesosilicatemineral with the chemical formula Al2SiO5.
Andalusite is an aluminium compound with high heat resistance used in furnaces, kilns and other industrial processes.
Andalusite Locality : Lüsens valley, Sellrain valley, North Tyrol, Tyrol, Austria Size : 7.4×6.2cm
AndalousiteTyrol.jpg
Didier DescouensOwn work
 

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Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
_______________________________________________________________
 
“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”

_____________________________________________________________

 

We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with limestone and dolomite.
 
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 
R

Wednesday Daily Feed, February 7, 2018

February 8, 2018
Greetings and Welcome to the Daily Rock and Mineral Feed.  This will consist of a daily (well – not always) compilation of around 10 decent photos of interest.
 
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.

These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

 

Enjoy!
 
Randy
 

Admin:  Anyone who wants off or on this distribution list just let me know and either you will be removed or added. R

1.  Anyone you know?
Image may contain: 1 person, text

2.  I think this is a Fantastic Condor Agate. it is unusual too with that cool Amethyst band. Those Fractures are healed with red and look odd also going against the Grain .
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Richard Nass shared his post to the group: The Rockhound Connection.

3.  El sueco agate with amazing banding and killer parallax
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4.  Lake Superior Agate
Image may contain: food

5.  Blue Salt. Blue color is probably caused by long exposure to low level radioactivity. R
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6.  Sold to a new home. Opalized ammonite. R
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7.
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8.  “Pele’s Hair,”
Pele’s hair is a form of lava. It is named after Pele, the Hawaiian goddess of volcanoes. It can be defined as volcanic glass fibers or thin strands of volcanic glass.[1] The strands are formed through the stretching of molten basaltic glass from lava, usually from lava fountains, lava cascades, and vigorous lava flows.”  Wikipedia

9.  Native silver wire spiral
The shapes of native metals never cease to amaze me, and this lovely 1.4 x 1 x .9 cm Celtic knotwork reminds me of some of my favourite styles of historical jewellery, though wrought by nature rather than man.
No automatic alt text available.
Image credit: Joe Budd/Rob Lavinsky/iRocks.com

10.  One of My Favorites. R
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Gouda news! January 20 is Cheese Lovers Day!