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December 10, 2017 Weekly Geology Guest, Herkimer Diamonds

December 11, 2017
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama: We will take a short break and long at Herkimer Diamonds, since they have been in the news lately.

Herkimer diamonds are not actually diamonds, but are double-terminatedquartz crystals of exceptional clarity (water-clear) discovered within exposed outcrops of dolostone in and around Herkimer County, New York and the Mohawk River Valley.[1] The “diamond” in their name is due to both their clarity and natural faceting – crystals possess double termination points and 18 total facets (six on each point, six around the center).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herkimer_diamondHerkimer

Diamond – Middleville, County of Herkimer, NY, USA.  in dolostone matrix.

2008.  Eigenes Werk

Loose Herkimer Diamonds / BB Grade, $32.50

https://i2.wp.com/davesrockshop.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/i/-/i-min-555.jpg

http://davesrockshop.com/bb-grade-herkimer-diamonds.html

Large “Herkimmer Diamond” Double Terminator.  https://spiritualtreasures.org/2016/12/15/large-herkimmer-diamond-double-terminator/https://spiritualtreasuresdotorg.files.wordpress.com/2016/12/s-l16001.jpg?w=980&h=980&crop=1

Herkimer Diamond.

https://i.pinimg.com/736x/2f/aa/41/2faa4185bee3c0f3b3958535a1e4d8f6--herkimer-diamond-crystals-minerals.jpg

Herkimer Diamond with oil inclusion.

https://i2.wp.com/www.herkimerhistory.com/InclusionsScepters/imag015.jpg
Herkimer Diamond Images

https://www.google.com/search?q=herkimer+diamond+images&client=firefox-b-1&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj-hI-Q4vnXAhWLw4MKHQZLAQ8QsAQIKA&biw=1536&bih=714

Best Herkimer Diamond Find Ever By American Geode

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iyXZmYYcEcE

Herkimer Diamond Mining
Enjoy!
Randall

December 3, 2017 Weekly Geology Guest, Gem Minerals

December 3, 2017
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
 
 
For the next several weeks (months) we will delve into Industrial Minerals, While they are not glamorous, they are terribly important to our modern way of life. 
 
 


Typical examples of industrial rocks and minerals are limestone, clays, sand, gravel, diatomite, kaolin, bentonite, silica, barite, gypsum, and talc. Some examples of applications for industrial minerals are construction, ceramics, paints, electronics, filtration, plastics, glass, detergents and paper.

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Gem Minerals

>    Too many pretties to chose from, but I have my biases.
A gemstone (also called a gem, fine gem, jewel, precious stone, or semi-precious stone) is a piece of mineral crystal which, in cut and polished form, is used to make jewelry or other adornments.[1][2] However, certain rocks (such as lapis lazuli, opal, and jade) or organic materials that are not minerals (such as amber, jet, and pearl) are also used for jewelry and are therefore often considered to be gemstones as well. Most gemstones are hard, but some soft minerals are used in jewelry because of their luster or other physical properties that have aesthetic value. Rarity is another characteristic that lends value to a gemstone.  Wikipedia

Welcome to the gemstone section, a free informational reference guide to gemstones, jewelry, and precious metals.
Gemstones A-Z

1.  Group of precious and semiprecious stones —both uncut and faceted— including (clockwise from top left) diamond, uncut synthetic sapphire, ruby, uncut emerald, and amethyst crystal cluster.
2010.  Rob Lavinsky @ IRocks.com

2.  A selection of gemstone pebbles made by tumbling rough rock with abrasive grit, in a rotating drum. The biggest pebble here is 40 mm (1.6 in) long.
2003.  Arpingstone

3.  Spanish emerald and gold pendant at Victoria and Albert Museum

4.  Amethyst
Image may contain: flower
Brazillian Amethyst. By ebay.com

5.  Raw gemstones

6.  Beryl.  Aquamarine
No automatic alt text available.

Geology Page

Locality: Dusso, Shigar valley, Skardu, Northern Areas, Pakistan
Size: 7.1 x 4.8 x 3.5 cm
Photo Copyright © Saphira Minerals

7.  Tourmaline and Lepidolite.
Image may contain: flower, plant and food

Crystal Sun Academy

Vibrant Elbaite Tourmaline with lovely Rose Lepidolite from Brazil.
Thanks Charlotte Noorjamal Anderson

8.  Banded Agate

Amazing Geologist

This is the most Beautiful agate I’ve ever seen. Look at the details (14″ x 6″) from Mexico.
Credit: Captain Tenneal\ Flickr


9.  Garnet
No automatic alt text available.

My Dream Crystals

Spessartine (1cm) from Pakistan. Collection: László Gál. photo: Stone Ásványfotós

10.  Opal
No automatic alt text available.
Amazing Geologist

Classic Black Crystal Opal from Lightning Ridge, New South Wales, Australia
Photo: Bonhams

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List of Industrial Minerals
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Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
_______________________________________________________________
“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”
 
Copyright Disclaimer: Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.
_________________________________________________________________________
Author’s Request:  If you see any pictures that you know the source and photographer, let me know immediately.  Thanks!  R

Images have been searched by TinEye Reverse Image Search.  http://tineye.com/
_________________________________________________________________

 
We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with Granite.
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

R

Monday Daily Feed, November 27, 2017

November 28, 2017
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.
These are the images and quotes that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

 

Enjoy!
 
Randy
 

 

1.  We will show some bright colors this Week.
This is a Indonesian Moss Agate supreme
No automatic alt text available.

2.  Wow and Nice! Almandine Garnet. R
Kupi László to Garnets worldwide

15 hrs ·

Almandine with Tridymite in Rhyolite from Regéc, Tokaj Mts., Hungary – Fov: 3cm (Self-collected in 2008)

3.  “Hauyne, haüyne ( /ɑːˈwin/[6]), hauynite or haüynite is a tectosilicate mineral with sulfate, with endmember formula Na3Ca(Si3Al3)O12(SO4). Mohs scale hardness 5 to 6.” Wikipedia. R  >>> Love that Blue.
No automatic alt text available.
Geology Wonders

17 hrs ·
Amazing Haüyne \\ In den Dellen quarries, Niedermendig, Mendig, Laach lake volcanic complex, Eifel, Rhineland-Palatinate, German.

4.  “Cerussite (also known as lead carbonate or white lead ore) is a mineral consisting of lead carbonate (PbCO3), and an important ore of lead. Baryte or barite (BaSO4) is a mineral consisting of barium sulfate.” Wikipedia >>> R
No automatic alt text available.
Heart of Gems Gallery is with John Zanas and 9 others.

Cerussite on Barite / ACF shaft, Mibladen, Midelt, Morocco

5.  Nice. Some of the fluorite crystals are like glass. R
No automatic alt text available.
mim museum

Fluorite – mim 878 – Russia
Nikolayï rudnik, Dal’negorsk, Primorskij Kraj
CaF2
Perfect colorless cubes surrounding a thin cream-colored gangue

6.  I need a bigger house with steel I beams.  R
The scenary isn’t bad either.
Image may contain: one or more people, people standing, tree, outdoor and nature
9 hrs ·
Gorgeous View !!

7.  Alms for the poor geologist, Gretchen needs one for her egg collection???!!!  R
No automatic alt text available.
Classic Black Crystal Opal from Lightning Ridge, New South Wales, Australia
Photo: Bonhams

8. Amazing amethyst carving.  R
No automatic alt text available.

Happy Thanksgiving

Carved amethyst crystal so cool

9. “Natrolite is a tectosilicate mineral species belonging to the zeolite group. It is a hydrated sodium and aluminium silicate with the formula Na2Al2Si3O10” Wikipedia.  R
No automatic alt text available.
Spikey Natrolite ‘catepillar’

10.  Another nice red garnet.  A cousin of almadine.
No automatic alt text available.
Spessartine (1cm) from Pakistan. Collection: László Gál. photo: Stone Ásványfotós

November 26, 2017 Weekly Geology Guest, Garnet

November 25, 2017
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
 
 
For the next several weeks (months) we will delve into Industrial Minerals, While they are not glamorous, they are terribly important to our modern way of life. 
 
 


Typical examples of industrial rocks and minerals are limestone, clays, sand, gravel, diatomite, kaolin, bentonite, silica, barite, gypsum, and talc. Some examples of applications for industrial minerals are construction, ceramics, paints, electronics, filtration, plastics, glass, detergents and paper.

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Garnet

from geology.com

Garnet is the name used for a large group of rock-forming minerals. These minerals share a common crystal structure and a generalized chemical composition of X3Y2(SiO4)3. In that composition, “X” can be Ca, Mg, Fe2+ or Mn2+, and “Y” can be Al, Fe3+, Mn3+, V3+ or Cr3+.

These minerals are found throughout the world in metamorphic, igneous, and sedimentary rocks. Most garnet found near Earth’s surface forms when a sedimentary rock with a high aluminum content, such as shale, is subjected to heat and pressure intense enough to produce schist or gneiss. Garnet is also found in the rocks of contact metamorphism, subsurface magma chambers, lava flows, deep-source volcanic eruptions, and the soils and sediments formed when garnet-bearing rocks are weathered and eroded.

Most people associate the word “garnet” with a red gemstone; however, they are often surprised to learn that garnet occurs in many other colors and has many other uses. In the United States, the major industrial uses of garnet in 2012 were waterjet cutting (35%), abrasive blasting media (30%), water filtration granules (20%), and abrasive powders (10%).

Uses of Garnet

Garnet Minerals

Mineral Composition Specific Gravity Hardness Colors Almandine Fe3Al2(SiO4)3 4.20 7 – 7.5 red, brown Pyrope Mg3Al2(SiO4)3 3.56 7 – 7.5 red to purple Spessartine Mn3Al2(SiO4)3 4.18 6.5 – 7.5 orange to red to brown Andradite Ca3Fe2(SiO4)3 3.90 6.5 – 7 green, yellow, black Grossular Ca3Al2(SiO4)3 3.57 6.5 – 7.5 green, yellow, red, pink, clear Uvarovite Ca3Cr2(SiO4)3 3.85 6.5 – 7 green

crushed and graded garnet abrasive granules
Garnet abrasive: This photo shows garnet granules that have been crushed and size-graded for use as abrasive, cutting, and filter media. They are used in waterjet cutting, “sand” blasting, sandpaper, water filtration, and a number of other uses. Almandine is the hardest garnet and also the most abundant. It is the garnet of choice for most abrasive applications. Photo by the United States Geological Survey.
 

Almandine in metamorphic rock

Eurico Zimbres (FGEL/UERJ) and Tom Epaminondas (mineral collector). 2004.  Paraíba, Brazil.

Grossular on display at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History. The green gem at right is a type of grossular known as tsavorite.
2005. from Wikipedia

Pendant in uvarovite, a rare bright-green garnet.
Photographed by Adrian Pingstone in February 2003 and released to the public domain.

Garnet var. Spessartine, Putian City, Putian Prefecture, Fujian Province, China

2/02/2009 Source Own work, specimen from the Willems Miner Collection Author JJ Harrison (jjharrison89@facebook.com) Permission
(Reusing this file)

Own work, share alike, attribution required (Creative Commons CC-BY-SA-2.

Lookie, A Real Garnet, but too big for mantle.
https://i2.wp.com/www.rasny.org/mineral/garnet/Jutta%20and%20garnetiferous%20amphibolite%20boulder-413w.JPG
Jutta standing next to a garnetiferous amphibolite boulder on display at Pit #1. This boulder is a fine example showing the large pyrope / almandine garnet porphyroblasts that the Gore Mountain mine is famous for.

Garnet Miners

http://granitecountyhistory.blogspot.com/2013/03/garnet-mining-district.html

MINE RAMBLINGS in the ADIRONDACK PARK’S GARNET WOODSfield-tunnel-mine-tracks

Almandine on gray-green schist Locality : Granatenkogel Mt. (north slope), Gaisberg valley, Obergurgl, Ötz valley,North Tyrol, Tyrol, Austria Size 19x11x7cm
Date 9 January 2011, Didier Descouens


______________________________________________________________

List of Industrial Minerals
_________________________________________________________
Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
_______________________________________________________________
“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”
 
Copyright Disclaimer: Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.
_________________________________________________________________________
Author’s Request:  If you see any pictures that you know the source and photographer, let me know immediately.  Thanks!  R

Images have been searched by TinEye Reverse Image Search.  http://tineye.com/
_________________________________________________________________

 
We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with Gem Minerals
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

R

November 19, 2017 Weekly Geology Guest, Fluorite

November 18, 2017
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
 
 
For the next several weeks (months) we will delve into Industrial Minerals, While they are not glamorous, they are terribly important to our modern way of life. 
 
 


Typical examples of industrial rocks and minerals are limestone, clays, sand, gravel, diatomite, kaolin, bentonite, silica, barite, gypsum, and talc. Some examples of applications for industrial minerals are construction, ceramics, paints, electronics, filtration, plastics, glass, detergents and paper.

_____________________________________________________________

Fluorspar

Fluorite

Fluorite (also called fluorspar) is the mineral form of calcium fluoride, CaF2.

>    Yes!  Pretty mineral with a nice family pedigree = Lots of Pretty Pictures.

Fluorite is a very useful mineral.

Fluorite is a colorful mineral, both in visible and ultraviolet light, and the stone has ornamental and lapidary uses. Industrially, fluorite is used as a flux for smelting, and in the production of certain glasses and enamels. The purest grades of fluorite are a source of fluoride for hydrofluoric acid manufacture, which is the intermediate source of most fluorine-containing fine chemicals. Optically clear transparent fluorite lenses have low dispersion, so lenses made from it exhibit less chromatic aberration, making them valuable in microscopes and telescopes. Fluorite optics are also usable in the far-ultraviolet and mid-infrared ranges, where conventional glasses are too absorbent for use.

fluorite
Fluorite: This photo shows several beautiful blue cubic crystals of fluorite with occasional pyrite crystals on their faces. Fluorite is commonly found as cubic crystals, but blue crystals are unusual. The blue color can be caused by trace amounts of yttrium substituting for calcium in the fluorite crystal structure. Photo by Giovanni Dall’Orto, used here under a Creative Commons license

Fluorite cleavage
Fluorite cleavage: Fluorite is the only common mineral with four directions of perfect cleavage. This perfect cleavage combined with the mineral’s isometric crystal structure frequently cause it to cleave into perfect octahedrons as shown here. These specimens also show the purple and yellow colors that are typical of fluorite. Photo by Hannes Grobe, used here under a Creative Commons license.

fluorescent fluorite
Fluorescent fluorite: Tumble-polished specimens of fluorite in normal light (top) and under short-wave ultraviolet light (bottom). The fluorescence appears to be related to the color and banding structure of the minerals in plain light.

fluorite crystal mass
Fluorite crystal mass: An impressive cluster of fluorite crystals from the Berbes Mine, Ribadesella, Asturias, Spain. Specimen and photo by Arkenstone / www.iRocks.com

fluoride products
Fluoride products: Most people are familiar with fluoride products used in the prevention of tooth decay. Fluoride is added to drinking water as a systemic fluoride therapy and added to toothpastes, mouthwashes and dental rinse as a topical fluoride therapy. These uses of fluoride have been controversial.

Fluorite gemstone
Fluorite gemstone: Fluorite can be a beautiful gemstone when faceted. It is mainly a gemstone for collectors because it has a hardness of 4 on the Mohs scale and because it cleaves easily in four directions

Banded fluorite cabochon
Banded fluorite cabochon: Colorful pieces of fluorite can be cut into beautiful cabochons and other ornamental objects. However, because of its low hardness and perfect cleavage, it is not suitable for many purposes.

Fluorite Images:

https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=A0LEViVdxRBaei0AqZIPxQt.;_ylu=X3oDMTByMjB0aG5zBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzYw–?p=Fluorite&fr=yhs-lvs-awc&hspart=lvs&hsimp=yhs-awc

______________________________________________________________

List of Industrial Minerals
_________________________________________________________
Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
_______________________________________________________________
“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”
 
Copyright Disclaimer: Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.
_________________________________________________________________________
Author’s Request:  If you see any pictures that you know the source and photographer, let me know immediately.  Thanks!  R

Images have been searched by TinEye Reverse Image Search.  http://tineye.com/
_________________________________________________________________

 
We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with garnet
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

R

Sunday Daily Feed, November 12, 2017

November 12, 2017
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.
These are the images and quotes that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

 

Enjoy!
 
Randy
 

 

1.  Icelandic James in the winter.  Maybe not so many trees?

Image may contain: snow, tree, sky, plant, outdoor and nature
Beautiful winter!

2.  Fjord at Lysefjorden, Norway

Image may contain: mountain, sky, outdoor and nature

3.  Stunning combination of Elbaite with albite and Lepidolite. From Oceanview Mine, San Diego County, California. © DI Anton Watzl

Image may contain: flower and food

4.  Jade

No automatic alt text available.

5.  It’s the China Copper Man?!

Image may contain: food
 
 
 

6.  a $75,000 Black Opal from Australia

No automatic alt text available.

7.  Nice opal to cheer your day. R

Image may contain: outdoor

8.  Large-Amethyst-agate-Stalactite-Slice-from-South-Parana-Artigas-Uruguay.  Photo: Golden-Hour

No automatic alt text available.

9.  PUNdora.  Punny Pete 9 hrs ·

Image may contain: text

I stand here perfectly still and just marble at the beauty of it. This pun is so well sculpted, it gives me chisels.

10.
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Saturday Daily Feed, November 11, 2017

November 12, 2017
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.
These are the images and quotes that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

 

Enjoy!
 
Randy
 

Admin:  Anyone who wants off or on this distribution list just let me know and either you will be removed or added.  R

1.  As a Grand Finale for Our Weekly Theme ,
I Present Aric`s Fantastic Banded Indonesian Agate

Image may contain: food
17 hrs ·

 
 
 

2.  Pyrite pseudomorped after brachiopod.


3.  A pyritized Ammonite is a thing of beauty.

No automatic alt text available.

4. My favorite piece of Peruvian Pyrite resting on Black Tourmaline.

Image may contain: food
7 hrs ·

 
 
 

5. This Goboboseb Amethyst seemed like a great way to start the day!

Image may contain: drink and outdoor

6. Now? How did they get the crystals to grow like that? Futuroscope’ Building in France

Image may contain: outdoor
7.
Image may contain: meme and text
Beth Glasgow Menninger  22 hrs ·

Oh. My. Gosh. This is spot on!

8. Me Wanna Go.  R

North Carolina Mountain Towns of Cashiers, Cherokee, Dillsboro, and Sylva

9. “Tetrahedrite is a copper antimony sulfosalt mineral with formula: (Cu,Fe)12, Sb4. S13. Tetrahedrite gets its name from the distinctive tetrahedron shaped cubic crystals. ” Wikipedia. R

Image may contain: night and food

Tetrahedrite
Botes, Romania

6.0 × 4.7 × 3.0 cm

10. Juneau AK Nite Lites.

Image may contain: night