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Monday, May 21, 2018 Daily Feed. Agates

May 21, 2018
Greetings and Welcome to the Daily Rock and Mineral Feed.  This will consist of a daily (well – not always) compilation of decent photos of interest.
 
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.

 

These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

Enjoy!

 
Randy
1.  Lace Agate
A neat slab of Crazy Lace Agate
2.  Arizona Agate
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Arizona agate
3.  Carnelian Agate geode, Oregon
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4.  Carnelian Agate slice
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5.  I thought this was pretty. Picked up in Tucson at show this yr.
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6.  for Agate Week
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7.  for Agate Week
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8. Staurolite is a red brown to black, mostly opaque, nesosilicate mineral with a white streak. It crystallizes in the monoclinic crystal system, has a Mohs hardness of 7 to 7.5 and the chemical formula: Fe2+2Al9O6(SiO4)4(O,OH)2. Another name is “Fairy Cross?. R
Image may contain: food
Staurolite – mim 1965 – Russia
Pestsovye Keivy, Kol’skiy poluostrov, Murmanskaya Oblast’
(Fe2+)2Al9Si4O23(OH)
Largest crystal: 8.4 cm

See More

Staurolite – mim 1965 – Russia
Pestsovye Keivy, Kol’skiy poluostrov, Murmanskaya Oblast’
(Fe2+)2Al9Si4O23(OH)

Largest crystal: 8.4 cm
Dimensions: 7.5 x 11.0 x 4.0 cm

Light colored slab studded with a beautiful cross shaped staurolite twin of brown color.

Clear colour plate topped with a beautiful chestnut-colored.
9.  Crinoids are marine animals.
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Juan José Escoriza Matéu shared a photo to the group: The Rockhound Connection.

Crinoid Agaricocrinus splendens (Miller and Gurley, 1890). Carboniferous (Mississippian). Fo. Edwardsville. Indiana. USA. 13 cm.
 
 
10.  Purple Amethyst

Amethyst on matrix. Photo by Joe Budd

Sunday Daily Feed, May 20m 2018

May 21, 2018
Greetings and Welcome to the Daily Rock and Mineral Feed.  This will consist of a daily (well – not always) compilation of decent photos of interest.
 
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.

 

These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

Enjoy!

 
Randy

1.  This is getting too close for comfort.
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2.  Trilobite
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Phacops. Extinct marine arthropod. Found only as a fossil. Calymene is a medium sized trilobites, living over 400 million years ago.

3.  5 inch Jaws.
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4.  I could buy a whole herd for what this one costs.
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One of my 2 favorite fossils from this year’s (2018) Tucson show. Tynsky’s Fossils had this horse fossil for sale in their room at the Hotel Tucson City Center. Notice the fish fossils on there too. I wanted to take it home with me but I didn’t have a spare million dollars!

5.  Love my red garnets.
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Garnets on matrix. Photo by Tóth László
>>>>>  Delayed by thunderstorm.

6.  Cool salt collection.
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Halite & Selenite
Sollstedt Potash Works, Bleicherode, Harz Mts.,Thuringia, Germany.
Photo: mardani.fine.minerals

7.  I want one!
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Beautiful aquamarine with black tourmaline and albite from Afghanistan.

8.  Proustite is a sulfosalt mineral consisting of; silver sulfarsenide, Ag3AsS3, known also as light red silver or ruby silver ore, and an important source of the metal.
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Prousitite. Photo by Tóth László

9.  How much?
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Michelle Shepherd is with Troy Newman.

This beautiful Oregon fire opal blade was created by Pat Antuzzi. The opal is mined by Outlaw Rocks at the Opal Queen Mine in southern Oregon. #outlawrocksllc

10.  Watermelon Tourmaline
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11.  Kunzite is the pink to light purple gem variety of the mineral Spodumene. 
Spodumene is a pyroxene mineral consisting of lithium aluminium inosilicate, LiAl(SiO3)2, and is a source of lithium.H = 6.5-7.0
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May 19, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Quartz

May 19, 2018
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Those giant crystals were discovered in a cave in the Swiss Alps by Franz von Arx and Elio Mulle.

Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:

We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with Quartz.
Quartz is a mineral composed of silicon and oxygen atoms in a continuous framework of SiO4 silicon–oxygen tetrahedra, with each oxygen being shared between two tetrahedra, giving an overall chemical formula of SiO2. Quartz is the second most abundant mineral in Earth‘s continental crust, behind feldspar.[7]

Some types of quartz crystals have piezoelectric properties; they develop an electric potential upon the application of mechanical stress.[52] An early use of this property of quartz crystals was in phonograph pickups. One of the most common piezoelectric uses of quartz today is as a crystal oscillator. The quartz clock is a familiar device using the mineral. The resonant frequency of a quartz crystal oscillator is changed by mechanically loading it, and this principle is used for very accurate measurements of very small mass changes in the quartz crystal microbalance and in thin-film thickness monitors.

Quartz, Tibet.
Quartz, Tibet.jpg
 

 

Quartz crystal demonstrating transparency,
Origem:Brasil
Author = Eurico Zimbres FGEL/UERJ

Herkimer Diamond
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fe/Quartz-167895.jpg
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com

Rock Crystal

Fatimid ewer in carved rock crystal (clear quartz) with gold lid, c. 1000.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ea/Ewer_birds_Louvre_MR333.jpg

A synthetic quartz crystal grown by the hydrothermal method, about 19 cm long and weighing about 127 grams

Amethyst
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/93/%2861-365%29_Can_you_imagine%3F_%285320329773%29.jpg/1280px-%2861-365%29_Can_you_imagine%3F_%285320329773%29.jpg
Sander van der Wel from Netherlands
 

 

Citrine

Rose Quartz
artz (Var.: Rose Quartz) Locality: Pitorra claim, Laranjeiras, Galiléia, Doce valley, Minas Gerais, Southeast Region, Brazil (Locality at mindat.org) Size: 3.4 x 2.9 x 2.6 cm. A Brazilian cluster of the most prized variety of quartz, consisting of intergrown compound crystals that have formed three “fingers”. There is no matrix here – the whole specimen is rose quartz.
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com

Rutilated Quartz
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/8b/Quartz-159777.jpg
Quartz (Var.: Rutilated Quartz) Locality: Ibitiara, Bahia, Northeast Region, Brazil (Locality at mindat.org) Size: 6.6 x 5.5 x 5.1 cm. An exceptional and rare CLUSTER of rutilated quartzes – so often found in singles or in damaged and unwieldy clunky clusters. This one, though, is among the brightest, showiest examples I have seen AND is a good size for the collector (as Sensel agreed with, writing “exceptional” on his label when he appraised the collection in 1990). This piece is nearly pristine, with just a few small “kisses” or dings on some crystal tips….but they go unnoticed amidst the crazy geometry of the rutile inclusions and the lustre, unless you look very closely. Especially when backlit, the piece glows with color. I am not normally big on these, but this one is VERY special and dramatic! I have seldom seen a cluster of this material I love, perhaps just a few pieces in the last 20 years? Ex. Dr. Eugene Sensel, Richard Hauck collections.
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com

Smoky Quartz
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a8/Quartz-168661.jpg
Quartz (Var.: Smoky Quartz) Locality: Switzerland (Locality at mindat.org) Size: 2.4 x 2.2 x 1.7 cm. A thumber of Swiss smoky quartz that amply show why they are the standard by which all other smokies are judged – with gem-like clarity and glassy luster.
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com

Our next industrial mineral challenge will be
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

R

Thursday Daily Feed, May 17, 2018

May 19, 2018
Greetings and Welcome to the Daily Rock and Mineral Feed.  This will consist of a daily (well – not always) compilation of decent photos of interest.
 
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.

 

These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

Enjoy!

 
Randy
 

 

1.  Pure Native Copper, 140#, Yard Art from MI.
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Michigan Float Copper (140 lbs)

2.    Nice Rose.
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Rosette Calcite on Fluorite. Photo by James Elliot

3.   Emerald.  This would look good in my display case.
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Emeralds on Matrix. Photo by Joe Budd.

4.    Jackson Co., NC, Cashiers and Sapphire, NC; our August vacation spot.

https://www.facebook.com/DiscoverJacksonNC/videos/1043534629134369/?hc_ref=ARROAoNnivHUgfWJxv-jzdb49aETuHowYmHcvEkFg8zYuYQqI7jdijH31nAH5mGqojU

5.    Wow. It has been a long time since I saw one of those in the AL Piedmont. R  (When Africa rammed AL)
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Accretionary lava ball comes to rest on the grass after rolling off the top of an ‘a’a flow in Royal Gardens subdivision.

6.    So far, none found in the back yard. R
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Natural Black Opal (OPAQUE) Indonesia.
credit : Nur Rachman Effendi

Clinoclase and Malachite. Photo by Tóth László
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7.    Green-Opal, Nevada.

8.  Banded Agate
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Stunning Coyamito agate pseudomorph with Quartz center.

9.     ” DANCING WITH the STARS “
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Fossil Star Fish

Richard Nass shared a post to the group: The Rockhound Connection.

Saturday Daily Feed, May 12, 2018 (Pretty Rocks)

May 12, 2018
Greetings and Welcome to the Daily Rock and Mineral Feed.  This will consist of a daily (well – not always) compilation of decent photos of interest.
 
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.

 

These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,
Now, let me see if I can get this duck to fly?

 

Enjoy!
 
Randy
 
 
1.    Petrified Wood from Arizona.
 
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Amazing Geologist

2.    OOOOOOOOOOOOO!  Nice.
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Malachite, Shattuckite, and Quartz – Namibia |#Geology
*Photo : © mineralmasterpiece
3.    Me want one.
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The Gold Tree from Colorado Quartz mine, Mariposa County, CA. Photo taken at Tucson Mineral show.
Credit: Nhminsci-MinBlog
4.   Me want that one too!
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Native Gold on Quartz. By exceptionalminerals.com
5.    Aquamarine:  It ain’t gold, but I’ll take that one too.
https://scontent-atl3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/32191085_977105025778182_1212948190874042368_n.jpg?_nc_cat=0&oh=c8e8c990e5dfcb97ad5e70a79dc02f4e&oe=5B927955
Aquamarine on Feldspar. By saphiraminerals.com
6.    Blue Halite (salt).  Sorry. that won’t fit in my salt shaker.
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6 hrs ·
Blue halite cluster with minor Sylvite. By Jeffery A. Scovil.
I’ll bring her to a halt here.  Plenty of pretties, as always, some with deep chemical formulas.
Just enjoy and share with you friends.

May 12, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Pumice

May 12, 2018
Image result for pumice images

 

Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:

We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with Pumice

Pumice ( /ˈpʌmɪs/), called pumicite in its powdered or dust form, is a volcanic rock that consists of highly vesicular rough textured volcanic glass, which may or may not contain crystals. It is typically light colored. Scoria is another vesicular volcanic rock that differs from pumice in having larger vesicles, thicker vesicle walls and being dark colored and denser.[1][2]

USES
 
Pumice is widely used to make lightweight concrete or insulative low-density cinder blocks. When used as an additive for cement, a fine-grained version of pumice called pozzolan is mixed with lime to form a light-weight, smooth, plaster-like concrete. This form of concrete was used as far back as Roman times. Roman engineers used it to build the huge dome of the Pantheon and as construction material for many aqueducts.
It is also used as an abrasive, especially in polishes, pencil erasers, cosmetic exfoliants, and the production of stone-washed jeans. “Pumice stones” are often used in beauty salons during the pedicure process to remove dry and excess skin from the bottom of the foot as well as calluses. It was also used in ancient Greek and Roman times to remove excess hair.[8] Finely ground pumice is added to some toothpastes and heavy-duty hand cleaners (such as Lava soap) as a mild abrasive. Pumice is also used as a growing substrate for growing horticultural crops. Some brands of chinchilla dust bath are made of powdered pumice.
Owing to its high demand particularly for water filtration, chemical spill containment, cement manufacturing, horticulture and increasingly for the pet industry, the mining of pumice in environmentally sensitive areas has been under more scrutiny after such an operation was stopped in the U.S. state of Oregon, at Rock Mesa in the southern part of the Three Sisters Wilderness.[9]

Pumice is mixed with soil to provide good aeration for the plants. It is also used for hydroponics as a soilless growing medium.

>    Many specimens have a high enough porosity that they can float on water until they slowly become waterlogged.  as in Pumice rafts.

Related image
Specimen of highly porous pumice from Teide volcano on Tenerife, Canary Islands
User MPF on en.wikipediaOwn work
 

 

Kutkhiny Baty, a pumice rock formation outcrop located 4 km from the source of the Ozernaya River (Lake Kurile), near the southern tip of the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia.

Image result for pumice images
Ahoy, Pumice afloat.

Sorry, No grande nor glorious nor Pretty pictures with this one, but one of those terribly important industrial minerals.  R

Our next industrial mineral challenge will be

Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

 

R

May 5, 2018 Weekly Geology Guest, Potassium

May 5, 2018
Image result for lepidolite images
Lepidolite Mala.
>    Always something for the Geologic Rock Hound.

Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potash

Potash (/ˈpɒtæʃ/) is any of various mined and manufactured salts that contain potassium in water-soluble form.

Potash is produced worldwide at amounts exceeding 60 million tonnes (40 million tonnes K2O equivalent) per year, mostly for use in fertilizers.

All commercial potash deposits come originally from evaporite deposits and are often buried deep below the earth’s surface.

In addition to its use as a fertilizer, potassium chloride is important in many industrialized economies, where it is used in aluminium recycling, by the chloralkali industry to produce potassium hydroxide, in metal electroplating, oil-well drilling fluid, snow and ice melting, steel heat-treating, in medicine as a treatment for hypokalemia, and water softening.

Potash evaporation ponds near Moab, Utah

Potassium Mineral (Sylvite?)
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Sylvite, Potassium Chloride
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Images of Potassium Feldspars.
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Microcline K Feldspar
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Lepidolite.  Potassium bearing mica.
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Microcline.  Potassium, Aluminum, Silicate, Feldspar
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Potassium Dichromate Crystals (natural)
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Underground Potash Mining.
Image result for Images of Potassium Mining

Yes, Humans do mine this stuff underground, even Russians.
Image result for Images of Potassium Mining

Our next industrial mineral challenge will be

Enjoy the adventure!

 

Thanks,

 

 

R