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February 28, 2016 Weekly Weather and Geology Guess

February 28, 2016
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:


Discussion on Alabama Geology, Part 1, as a PDF is attached.  Discussion below.
This article provides a good overview of Alabama Geology.  By Nick Tew and Sandy Ebersole of the Geological Survey of Alabama.

http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/article/h-1549

Enjoy the discussion and please throw you 2 cents or quarter’s worth of comments and questions.

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Last Week On the Bluff:

 
–    68 was the high and 31 was the low.
–    Rainfall total on the Bluff was 2.4 inches.
–    Maximum wind gust was 22 mph.  

Metro Birmingham Forecast for the New Week

 
–    68 is the high and 36 is the forecast low.
–    1.1 inches of rain is forecast for the week.
–    Sunshine by next weekend.
*    Severe Weather possible for Tuesday Night and Wednesday morning.  Isolated damaging winds up to 60 mph.
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Weather Guesses


Alabama All Weather Hazards Awareness:
http://www.srh.noaa.gov/images/bmx/aware/swaw_2011/web_version2.pdf

NWS, Huntsville, AL:        http://www.srh.noaa.gov/hun/
NWS, Birmingham, AL:     http://www.srh.noaa.gov/bmx/
NWS, Mobile, AL:              http://www.srh.noaa.gov/mob/

 

Metro Birmingham.  Compliments of ABC3340.

(for Detailed Graphical Forecast)
Weather Underground Map for Metro Birmingham.
(Just wander around the state to pick your closest weather station).

http://www.wunderground.com/wundermap/?lat=33.24038696&lon=-86.82407379&zoom=10&pin=

 

Weather Forecast by AccuWeather  (Pick your time, day, or month)
Space Weather.  http://spaceweather.com/

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Minerals and Rocks – The Good Life from the Ground
 
“If it ain’t grown, it has to be mined”

Topic of the Week:  Geology of Alabama (Part 1 of ?)

 

Geologic Maps of Alabama

https://images.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search;_ylt=A0LEVvx838hWGSAAsqIPxQt.;_ylu=X3oDMTByMjB0aG5zBGNvbG8DYmYxBHBvcwMxBHZ0aWQDBHNlYwNzYw–?p=Geology+of+Alabama&fr=yhs-befrugal-002&hspart=befrugal&hsimp=yhs-002

Part 1 covers the first 11 pages of a Power Point Presentation.  Attached as a PDF File.
Page 1.  Welcome
Page 2.  Sweet Geologic Home Alabama
Pages 3 and 4.  A very simplistic overview of the basic geologic concepts that are involved with a discussion of this type.  For most beginners, this will be new and novel.  Check with Wikipedia in regards to the concept or send me a note and I will try and answer.  Thanks, R.
Page 5.  Shows a basic table of the Geological Time Scale.  Eras is shown in the first left column.  The second column show the approximate dates of each period.  A Period is the basic time scale that geologists use.  We usually do not mentions specific dates, but refer to the Period, such as Silurian.  The Period Names were generated from the type locality that it was identified in.
“The Silurian system was first identified by British geologist Sir Roderick Impey Murchison, who was examining fossil-bearing sedimentary rock strata in south Wales in the early 1830s. He named the sequences for a Celtic tribe of Wales, the Silures, inspired by his friend Adam Sedgwick, who had named the period of his study the Cambrian, the Latin name for Wales”  Wikipedia.
Note:  The major tectonic or mountain building events are not included in this table.
Page 6.  Shows a colorful geologic map with their accompany physiographic provinces.
Note:  We will divide the state into each of its 5 Physiographic Provinces as we discuss Alabama.
Page 7  Shows the Alabama Physiographic Provinces with the major state highways.
Pages 8 through 11  Discusses the Alabama River Systems.  All of which are controlled by their geology.
Take a guess as to how many rivers there are in Alabama?  I bet you can’t name them all!  R
Page 9.  Shows the river systems in the state.  The left one shows the counties, while the right one shows the impact of the Fall Line.  The Fall Line is where the rivers flow out of the highlands and harder rocks into the Alabama Coastal Plain.  The Fall Line was sought out by the earlier settlers to build their stream powered mills.
Discussion of the Left Figure.  Why does the Tennessee River flow west at Guntersville?  Most rivers in the Northern Hemisphere flow to the south.  One theory as shown by the arrow pointing south-west, is that the Tennessee River originally flowed south in the Warrior River Basin.  Much discussion on this one, probably due to tectonic activity.
Page 11.  Good old river gravel.  A very important item when it comes to construction.  Also a good place to attempt to find banded agates and petrified wood.
Many pleasant memories sitting and lying on those gravel piles, drinking coffee, and eating Krispy Kream donuts.
Thanks,
Randy
References:
–    Lost Worlds of Alabama by Jim Lacefield.
–    Wikipedia
–    Geological Survey of Alabama
–    Any many others that I am indebted to.
–    Also my Professors and mentors, most of whom are now deceased.
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Another Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
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“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”
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Copyright Disclaimer: Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

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Author’s Request:  If you see any pictures that you know the source and photographer, let me know immediately.  Thanks!  R

Images have been searched by TinEye Reverse Image Search.  http://tineye.com/

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Have A Great Week!

1.  PreCambrian Age Fossils, Stromatolites-Jacutophyton.  by Gettyimages

1. PreCambrian Age Fossils, Stromatolites-Jacutophyton. by Gettyimages

2.  Cambrian Age Fossol, Trilobite. by Unknown

2. Cambrian Age Fossol, Trilobite. by Unknown

3.  Ordovician Age Fossil, Brachiopod.  by Unknown

3. Ordovician Age Fossil, Brachiopod. by Unknown

4.  Silurian Age Fossil. Eurypterus_remipes NY.  cc_by_sa_3-0_H_Zell_photo_300

4. Silurian Age Fossil. Eurypterus_remipes NY. cc_by_sa_3-0_H_Zell_photo_300

5.  Devonian Age Fossils.  Dunkleosteous-Armored Fish. by Unknown

5. Devonian Age Fossils. Dunkleosteous-Armored Fish. by Unknown

6.  Mississippian Age, Crinoid fossil. www-sciencenationalgeographic-com

6. Mississippian Age, Crinoid fossil. www-sciencenationalgeographic-com

7.  Pennsylvanian Age Fossil Fern-pecopteris. from-mazon-b8f4be

7. Pennsylvanian Age Fossil Fern-pecopteris. from-mazon-b8f4be

8.  Triassic Age Fossils.  Staurikosaurus feeding on Dicynodont.  by Nobu Tamura

8. Triassic Age Fossils. Staurikosaurus feeding on Dicynodont. by Nobu Tamura

9.  Jurassic Age Fossil.  Ichthyosaurus-Fischsaurier, aquatic reptile.  by Fritz Geller-Grimm

9. Jurassic Age Fossil. Ichthyosaurus-Fischsaurier, aquatic reptile. by Fritz Geller-Grimm

10.  Cretaceous Age Fossil. Tylosaurus_pembinensis. by Dmitry Bogdanov

10. Cretaceous Age Fossil. Tylosaurus_pembinensis. by Dmitry Bogdanov

11.  Tertiary Period.  Megalodon_tooth_with_great_white_sharks_teeth.  by  Brocken Inaglory

11. Tertiary Period. Megalodon_tooth_with_great_white_sharks_teeth. by Brocken Inaglory

12.  Quaternary Period.  ice_age. imgarcade.com

12. Quaternary Period. ice_age. imgarcade.com

12.  Quaternary Period.  MAN.  uky edu hulu com.

12. Quaternary Period. MAN. uky edu hulu com.

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