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January 8, 2017 Weekly Geology Guess of the Missoula Floods

January 7, 2017
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:

 

We now venture forth into new geology mysteries.
We had 3 suggestions for topics, Glenn recommended plate tectonics, Dale recommended the Yellowstone Super Volcano; and the other as a personal request from Vern, the Missoula Floods.
 
 
 
                        Missoula Floods
The attached Adobe file of the Columbia River between Richlands. WA and Hanford Nuclear Arsenal, shows a sandy cliffs on the east bank, north of Richlands and before the River bends.  Vern and his sister found grass and sticks sticking out of the sand.  His question was, did the vegetation come from the Missoula Flood or some other event?
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Comment from Author:
>    Based on my current understanding of the Missoula Flood, it probably filled the Columbia River gorge North of Richands to the top of the gorge and beyond creating the temporary Lake Lewis at Wallulah Gap.
 
Therefore it is likely that the plant debris could be from the Missoula Floods,  precluding any more recent flood events.
“The water began to build up behind the 2,500-foot ice dam filled the valleys to the east with water, creating a glacial lake the size of Lake Erie and Lake Ontario combined. The water continued to rise until it reached its maximum height at an elevation of 4,200 feet. As the water rose, the pressure against the ice dam increased, ultimately, causing the dam to fail catastrophically. The failure occurred when the water reached a depth of 2000 feet. The water pressure caused the glacier to become buoyant, and water began to escape beneath the ice dam by carving sub-glacial tunnels at an exponential rate.
It is estimated that the maximum rate of flow was equal to 9.46 cubic miles per hour (386 million cubic feet per second). This rate is 60 times the flow of the Amazon River, the largest river in the world today. At this rate, the lake probably drained in a few days to a week. Water moving at speeds between 30 and 50 miles per hour raced across eastern Washington” http://www.glaciallakemissoula.org/story.html
Montana Natural History Center
120 Hickory Street
Missoula, Montana 59801
 
www.MontanaNaturalist.org
phone 406.327.0405
fax 406.327.0421
 
Copyright 2002-2005
Some others say the water flooded as fast as 70-80 mph.  See image of Palouse Falls below.
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During the Ice Age Floods, Dry Falls was under 300 feet (91 m) of water approaching at a speed of 65 miles per hour (105 km/h).[1]
The Missoula Floods (also known as the Spokane Floods or the Bretz Floods) refer to the cataclysmic floods that swept periodically across eastern Washington and down the Columbia River Gorge at the end of the last ice age.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missoula_Floods

HUGEfloods.com    Pasco, WA
Portland Museum of the City:  (see photos and images) > Good job.http://www.museumofthecity.org/project/the-great-missoula-floods/

USGS Map of the Missoula Floods

File:Map missoula floods.gif

Legend

   Cordilleran Ice Sheet
   maximum extent of Glacial Lake Missoula (eastern) and Glacial Lake Columbia (western)
   areas swept by Missoula and Columbia floods
2004. Matthew Trump

Excellent Article with Outstanding Video of Lake Missoula and Flood

Academia:  According to the “tea leaf” readers, there were at least 3 major floods and maybe as many as 100 different flood events.
LORE:    Another interesting tale either from my readings, Indian Lore, or my imagination(?), you could hear the flood coming for up to 1-hour before the event.  Me wonders if you could climb out of the Columbia River Gorge, east of Portland, quick enough.  Must of been a mad scramble between all the critters > wolves, bears, cougars, elk, and who knows what else.
>    As with most of my weekly fores into geology, with each topic I could write many papers and dissertations.
>    As usual, I scramble to just stay ahead of my audience.
Note:  I have intentionally reduced the amount of linked graphics in this email due to the amount of space required and trying to untangle everything the following week has been a mess.
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References include:

 

–    Wikipedia
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Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
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“No copyright infringement intended.

The rights belong to their respective owners”
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Copyright Disclaimer: Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.
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Author’s Request:  If you see any pictures that you know the source and photographer, let me know immediately.  Thanks!  R

Images have been searched by TinEye Reverse Image Search.  http://tineye.com/

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Next week we will try and pick up the missing pieces from the Missoula Floods?
and tidy the place up???
 
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
R

columbia-river-richlands

missoula-floods-usgs-map

missoula-floods-usgs-map

lakelmissoula-map-with-scablands-map-from-museum-of-the-city-2016-by-jessica-sterling

lakelmissoula-map-with-scablands-map-from-museum-of-the-city-2016-by-jessica-sterling

transient-lakes-washington-oregon-2009-usgs-williamborg

transient-lakes-washington-oregon-2009-usgs-williamborg

missoula-ice-dam-2016-from-museum-of-the-city

missoula-ice-dam-2016-from-museum-of-the-city

missoula-floods-portland-flood-2016-museum-of-the-city

missoula-floods-portland-flood-2016-museum-of-the-city

missoula-floods-dry_falls_wa-2007-jina-lee

missoula-floods-dry_falls_wa-2007-jina-lee

misssoula-floods-palouse-falls-spitvineagar-com

misssoula-floods-palouse-falls-spitvineagar-com

missoula-floods-latah-creek-spokane-wa-museum-of-the-city

missoula-floods-latah-creek, glacial sediments-spokane-wa-museum-of-the-city

missoula-floods-size-ice-dam1-winefolly

missoula-floods-size-ice-dam1-winefolly

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