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August 20, 2017 Weekly Geology Guest, Asbestos

August 21, 2017
>    Sorry folks, we have been on vacation from August 11-18, in the Mountains of SW NC, Cashiers, Highlands, Sapphire.  They were gearing up big time =$$$ for the solar eclipse on Monday.
 
 
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
 
 
For the next several weeks we will delve into Industrial Minerals, While they are not glamorous, they are terribly important to our modern way of life. 
 
 

 

Typical examples of industrial rocks and minerals are limestone, clays, sand, gravel, diatomite, kaolin, bentonite, silica, barite, gypsum, and talc. Some examples of applications for industrial minerals are construction, ceramics, paints, electronics, filtration, plastics, glass, detergents and paper.

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Asbestos
“Asbestos is a set of six naturally occurring silicate minerals,[1] which all have in common their eponymous asbestiform habit: i.e. long crystals (roughly 1:20 aspect ratio), thin fibrous crystals, with each visible fiber composed of millions of microscopic “fibrils” that can be released by abrasion and other processes.[2] They are commonly known by their colors, as blue asbestos, brown asbestos, white asbestos, and green asbestos.[3]”
“Despite the severity of asbestos-related diseases, the material has extremely widespread use in many areas.  Some of the properties include sound adsorption; resistant to fire, heat and electricity; electrical insulation; building insulation; fire proofing; and vehicle brakes.  Just to name a few.”

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Serpentine.
Serpentine:  Chrysotile asbestos
by USGS.
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Amphiboles.
Asbestos with muscovite.jpg
Asbestos – Tremolite with_muscovite, Brtmrts. Outer Hebrides.  Nat. Hist. Museum, London. by Aram Dulyan  jpg

Asbestos (tremolite) silky fibres from Val di Susa, Italy. Photograph taken at the Natural History Museum, London.

Aram Dulyan

Blue Asbestos

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/db/Gruenerite_Schist_Metamorphic_Rock_North_of_Keystone%2C_South_Dakota_2916.jpg
Gruenerite Schist Metamorphic Rock North of Keystone, South Dakota.  2007.  Dave Dyet
 
 
Crocidolite, variety of riebeckite, from Pomfret Mine, Vryburg, South Africa.  2009.  Raimond Spekking
Richterite-mrz156a.jpg
Richterite Locality: Wilberforce, Monmouth Township, Haliburton County, Ontario, Canada.  Rob Lavinsky of IRocks.
 
 
Actinolite Portugal.jpg
Actinolite (acicular form) with calcite Locality : Montijos Quarry, Monte Redondo, Leiria, Leiria District, Portugal. Size 8×7.5 cm
Didier DescouensOwn work
Anthophyllite Suède Fond.jpg
Anthophyllite – Kopparberg, Ljusnarsberg, Västmanland, Sweden – Size 47x43x30 mm.  2010. 
Didier Descouens
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List of Industrial Minerals
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Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
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“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”
 
Copyright Disclaimer: Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.
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Author’s Request:  If you see any pictures that you know the source and photographer, let me know immediately.  Thanks!  R

Images have been searched by TinEye Reverse Image Search.  http://tineye.com/
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We will now start down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with naturally occurring asphalt.

 
 
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 
 

 

R
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b7/Asbestos_fibres.jpg
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