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October 8, 2017 Weekly Geology Guest, Carbonatites

October 12, 2017
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
 
 
For the next several weeks we will delve into Industrial Minerals, While they are not glamorous, they are terribly important to our modern way of life. 
 
 


Typical examples of industrial rocks and minerals are limestone, clays, sand, gravel, diatomite, kaolin, bentonite, silica, barite, gypsum, and talc. Some examples of applications for industrial minerals are construction, ceramics, paints, electronics, filtration, plastics, glass, detergents and paper.

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Carbonatite

This one is a new one to me.
Carbonatite ( /kɑːrˈbɒnətt/) is a type of intrusive or extrusive igneous rock defined by mineralogic composition consisting of greater than 50% carbonate minerals.
 
Economic Importance:   
Carbonatites may contain economic or anomalous concentrations of rare-earth elements, phosphorus, niobiumtantalum, uranium, thorium, copper, iron, titanium, vanadium, barium, fluorine, zirconium, and other rare or incompatible elements. Apatite, barite and vermiculite are among the industrially important minerals associated with some carbonatites.
 

Carbonatite from Jacupiranga Estado de São Paulo, Brazil. The specimen is 20 cm X 14 cm. Mineralogical composition: the black minerals are magnetite, the white are calcite and the green ones are olivine.
Carbonatite.jpg

2008. by Eurico Zimbres Zimbres
 
 

Carbonatite lava at Ol Doinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania

2001.  by Thomas Kraft, Kufstein
 

The carbonatite complex of Sukulu, Uganda, as seen from Tororo Rock.
File:Sukulu1.jpg


Trivia:  Only one carbonatite volcano is known to have erupted in historical time, the active Ol Doinyo Lengai volcano in Tanzania. It erupts with the lowest-temperature lava in the world, at 500–600 °C.

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List of Industrial Minerals
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Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
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“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”
 
Copyright Disclaimer: Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.
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Author’s Request:  If you see any pictures that you know the source and photographer, let me know immediately.  Thanks!  R

Images have been searched by TinEye Reverse Image Search.  http://tineye.com/
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We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with Corundum.
 
 
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

R
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