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December 17, 2017 Weekly Geology Guest, Granite

December 17, 2017
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
 
 
For the next several weeks (months) we will delve into Industrial Minerals, While they are not glamorous, they are terribly important to our modern way of life. 
 
 


Typical examples of industrial rocks and minerals are limestone, clays, sand, gravel, diatomite, kaolin, bentonite, silica, barite, gypsum, and talc. Some examples of applications for industrial minerals are construction, ceramics, paints, electronics, filtration, plastics, glass, detergents and paper.

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Granite

(Now let’s see if all of these various formats will fly in unison?)  R
Granite is a light-colored igneous rock with grains large enough to be visible with the unaided eye. It forms from the slow crystallization of magma below Earth’s surface. Granite is composed mainly of quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of mica, amphiboles, and other minerals. This mineral composition usually gives granite a red, pink, gray, or white color with dark mineral grains visible throughout the rock.
Geology.com

Uses of Granite

Granite is the rock most often quarried as a “dimension stone” (a natural rock material that has been cut into blocks or slabs of specific length, width, and thickness). Granite is hard enough to resist most abrasion, strong enough to bear significant weight, inert enough to resist weathering, and it accepts a brilliant polish. These characteristics make it a very desirable and useful dimension stone.
Most of the granite dimension stone produced in the United States comes from high-quality deposits in five states: Massachusetts, Georgia, New Hampshire, South Dakota, and Idaho.
Granite has been used for thousands of years in both interior and exterior applications. Rough-cut and polished granite is used in buildings, bridges, paving, monuments, and many other exterior projects. Indoors, polished granite slabs and tiles are used in countertops, tile floors, stair treads, and many other practical and decorative features.
Geology.com

Yosemite Nature Notes – 20 – Granite

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=25&v=Y5RQp77uVPA

 

Fjaere granite. 

Fjæregranitt3.JPG
2007.  Friman.

https://i1.wp.com/geology.com/rocks/pictures/granite-large-orthoclase.jpg

Various granites (cut and polished surfaces)
2010.  Jstuby at en.wikipedia

Half Dome, Yosemite National Park, a classic granite dome and popular rock climbing destination
2004.  Jon Sullivan

Rock of Ages Granite Quarry, Vermont
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/42/f1/e4/42f1e465b3d7be07ae8261d4640d41cc.jpg
Pinterest.  Flickr
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List of Industrial Minerals
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Editors Note:  It is the intent of this site to keep this discussion as simple as possible, so as to educate the interested general public and not to discuss with the geology crowd the latest geologic theories and nuances.  Thanks, R
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“No copyright infringement intended.
The rights belong to their respective owners”
 
Copyright Disclaimer: Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.
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Author’s Request:  If you see any pictures that you know the source and photographer, let me know immediately.  Thanks!  R

Images have been searched by TinEye Reverse Image Search.  http://tineye.com/
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We will now continue down the Industrial Mineral dusty trail and continue with Graphite.
 
Enjoy the adventure!
 
Thanks,
 

R

Granite, 12-17-17

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