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Tuesday Daily Feed, December 19, 2017, Coal Miner

December 20, 2017
Pinterest, 572 7th Street · San Francisco CA, 94103
These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

 

Enjoy!
 
Randy
 
Editor:  I know that this may not be politically or socially correct for others, but coal has played a star role in developing this country.  Having worked in the mines, it sort of get in your blood.
Yes times are changing and it is all economically driven = cheapest price.
Thanks,
Randy

1.  Underground longwall mining.
Cola Miner

2.    Coal Miner.
Coal keeps the lights on...God bless our miners.

3.    Where does your electricity come from?
COAL MINERS

4. Historic Picture of a Face Drill.  Drilling coal to load powder charges.  Sometimes you have to do it this way because it is the only way.  Note the timbers and props over their heads.
Coal Miners abt 1952

5.
COAL=America's Power!

6.    Young boy working in the mines as a powder monkey.  Note the oil lamp on his head.  Yes-Yes, in Birmingham, both ore mines and coal mines.
Coal Boy Miner Vintage 8x10 Reprint Of Old Photo

7.  Just like my Daddy’s lunch bucket,water on bottom food on top

Note by Susan Cupstid

Coal miners bucket- Just like my Daddy's! He always had a special treat in it for me!!!

8.  Underground coal mine, track haulage.
Huston Colleries Co., Keystone, West Virginia, coal mine

9.    Coal Mine Roof Bolter
Coal Mining - roof bolting Gebrauchte Baumaschinen im Einsatz . Bohrgerät im Untertagebau #Atlascopco #gebrauchtebaumaschinen #heavyequipment

10.  Coal miner coming off shift.  Sometimes the coal dust was so thick on the faces, one could not tell the white folks from the Black.
In Birmingham, you could tell where your husband worked by the color of his white Sunday shirt.  Black = coal mine.  Red = Iron Ore.  Gray = Steel worker in foundry or furnace.  Chalky white to gray = limestone miner or cement plant.
{true story} Coal miner Lee Hipshire in 1976, shortly after emerging from a mine in Logan County, W. Va. at the end of his shift. At age 36, he had worked 26 years underground. A few years later, Lee took early retirement because of pneumoconiosis, or black lung disease. He died at 57.
Article from
NPR Pins
Happy Holidays, especially for those that work underground and other dangerous places to get these beautiful mineral specimens.
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