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August 24, 2018, White Arsenic

August 24, 2018
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
More nasty stuff that man kind torments itself with, in the name of beauty ???
The United StatesEnvironmental Protection Agency states that all forms of arsenic are a serious risk to human health.[8] The United States’ Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry ranked arsenic as number 1 in its 2001 Priority List of Hazardous Substances at Superfund sites.[9] Arsenic is classified as a Group-A carcinogen.[8]
Extensive arsenic contamination of groundwater has led to widespread arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh[101] and neighboring countries.

In the Victorian era, “arsenic” (“white arsenic” or arsenic trioxide) was mixed with vinegar and chalk and eaten by women to improve the complexion of their faces, making their skin paler to show they did not work in the fields.[46] Arsenic was also rubbed into the faces and arms of women to “improve their complexion”.

Metallic Arsenic.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7b/Arsen_1a.jpg

Arsen_1.jpg: Original uploader was Tomihahndorf at de.wikipedia derivative work: Materialscientist (talk) Arsen_1.jpg

Native Arsenic.

Aram Dulyan (User:Aramgutang)Own work

Massive native arsenic with quartz and calcite, from Ste. Marie-aux-mines, Alsace, France. Photo taken at the Natural History Museum, London.

Realgar, α-As4S4, is an arsenic sulfide mineral, also known as “ruby sulphur” or “ruby of arsenic”. It is a soft, sectile mineral occurring in monoclinic crystals, or in granular, compact, or powdery form, often in association with the related mineral, orpiment (As2S3).

Realgar-229713.jpg

 

Realgar Locality: Royal Reward Mine, Green River Gorge, Franklin, King County, Washington, USA (Locality at mindat.org) Size: 2.2 x 1.1 x 0.8 cm. An aesthetic cluster of gemmy, bright, cherry-red realgar crystals nicely attached to a bit of matrix. This piece is from the less well-known Royal Reward Mine of Washington. The specimen probably dates to the 1970s. Ex. Jaime Bird Collection.

Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

“Nasty Stuff” !

 

Thanks,

R

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