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Tuwaday, September 11, 2018, 2018, Daily Feed

September 11, 2018
Greetings and Welcome to the Daily Rock and Mineral Feed.  This will consist of a daily (well – not always) compilation of decent photos of interest.
 
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.

 

These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

Enjoy!

 
Randall
1. Manicouagan Crater in the Canadian Shield
Manicouagan Crater in the Canadian Shield is one of the largest known terrestrial impact craters (astrobleme). It is ~65 kilometers in diameter and was created ~214 million years ago by the impact of a hypervelocity meteor (~20km/sec) about 5 km in diameter. The crater contains an annular lake called Manicouagan Reservoir which surrounds René-Levasseur Island. The reservoir spans an area of nearly 2,000 kms. The lake and island are clearly visible from space and are known as the “eye of Québec “. At the point of impact, the rocks were instantaneously shattered and melted by the energy released, leaving a 200 to 600 cu km sheet of impact melt directly upon the basement rocks. The force of the impact exhumed and liquefied these rocks down to as deep as 9 km. The heat released was so intense that it took between 1,600 and 5,000 years before the melted rocks cooled. The annular moat, prominent in space images, fills a ring where impact-brecciated rock was once eroded away by glaciation. Erosion has removed about a km. of rock from the region. The diameter of the original crater was approximately three times the size of the circular lake as seen from the space photo. hashtag#geology hashtag#impactcrater hashtag#canada
Richard Fink

Richard Fink Independent Mining and Minerals Industry Advisor

It is interesting to note that Manicouagan is estimated to be the 5th largest impact crater on earth, but there is no mass extinction associated with this event. 

2. I want some of them purple agates with my samich, R

Image may contain: plant, flower, outdoor, food and nature
Natural Botryoidal Chalcedony purple Grape Agate Specimen Indonesia
Photo: @indomineralsamektha

Geology Wonders

3. Love it.  R

Image may contain: plant and outdoor

North Carolina Mountain Towns of Cashiers, Cherokee, Dillsboro, and Sylva

Take the scenic route on The Blue Ridge Parkway. 🚘🌲 This 469-mile highway hugs Jackson County’s northwest border and was the first road in the world designed for leisure travel. Find your route on our website. 📷 Keith Kustmann https://jax.onl/blueridgeparkway

4.  Never saw that (quartz crystals) in my mining daze.  R

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, outdoor
Arx and Elio Mulle. Look the post I shared days ago.
Franz Von Arx L Crystals.-
Another photo belonging to the post I shared a few days ago about the finding of these gigantic quartz in the Swiss Alps.
One more picture about these giant crystals were discovered in Swiss Alps by Franz von Arx and Elio Mulle. Look the post I shared days ago.

4.  Kool Lava

'Mountain of God' the Weirdest Volcano in the World

5.  Adamite is a zinc arsenate hydroxide mineral, Zn2AsO4OH.

Image may contain: food
PARADAMITE is a zinc arsenate hydroxide.
It is a “polymorph” or “dimorph” (different words meaning the same thing) of the more common arsenic mineral, ADAMITE.
Dimorphous * means that the two minerals have the same chemical formula, yet different structures.
* Di means two. Morphous means shape
From Mexico

6.  Another Wow. Sapphire.

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Corundum (var. Sapphire) – me 1538-Myanmar
Mogok, Sagaing Division, Mandalay
Al2O3
Barrel-shaped crystal with slightly “melted” shapes showing a different color according to the light (gray-green in daylight, more pinkish in artificial light); this effect could be due to the presence of traces of vanadium.
Crystal in keg with a little “rendered” with a different colour following light (Grey-Green in light of the day, and rather pink in artificial light); this effect would be due to vanadium traces.

7.

No automatic alt text available.

 

Wulfenite | #Geology
Chemical Formula: Pb(MoO4)
Color: Orange-yellow
Locality: Los Lastonares Mines, Albuñuelas, Granada, Andalusia, Spain
Amazing Geologist
FOV: 5 mm

Photo Copyright © Christian Rewitzer

8.  Sure looks flowery?.  R

Pyrrhotite is an iron sulfide mineral with the formula Fe(1-x)S (x = 0 to 0.2).
Rhodonite is a manganese inosilicate, (Mn, Fe, Mg, Ca)SiO3

No automatic alt text available.
Rhodonite and Pyrrhotite From Huallanca, Peru
Amazing Geologist

9.  Diamond

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NEW MINERAL @ mim museum

Diamond – mim 1591 – Russia
C
Udachnaya-Vostochnaya Trubka, Respublika Sakha, Sibir’

Transparent almost perfect 53.05 carat octahedron with smooth and flat faces, with some slightly modified terminations and inclusions (of flattened sulfide crystals, probably pyrrhotite+pentlandite) in its center. The latter are reflected 4 times thanks to a kaleidoscope effect on the faces. Unlike most diamonds, this one has almost not been dissolved by the kimberlite which must have risen very fast to the surface of the Earth, hence the flat and smooth faces, as well as the straight edges. Such crystals are known in the trade as “Glassies”

53.05-carat octahedron, transparent almost perfect with smooth and flat faces, with a few slightly modified peaks and inclusions (flattened crystals of sulphides, probably pyrrhotite+pentlandite) at the centre that is 4 times by kaleidoscope effect. Unlike most diamonds, it was virtually not dissolved by the kimberlite, which had to lift it quickly to the surface of the earth, hence flat and smooth surfaces, as well as very sharp sides. Such crystals are called “glassies”.
 
 

10. 
Now? Where would we put it? Mantle is not big enough and is cluttered already. Fireplace is full. Yard art? R
Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, playing a sport and standing

I made it home from The Denver Show!! Had to leave this!! Lol. But bought a few nice pieces I wanted.

TIFFANY STONE!! This rose quartz Sphere is $15,000. Thanks Woodie Stephen Woodruff for finding out the price!
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