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Friday Daily Feed, August 31, 2018

September 1, 2018
Where does time go?
Greetings and Welcome to the Daily Rock and Mineral Feed.  This will consist of a daily (well – not always) compilation of decent photos of interest.
 
The Rockhound Connection
 
and numerous quotes and images from my Facebook friends.

 

These are the images that appeal to my sensibilities or the lack thereof.
Thanks,

Enjoy!

 
Randy

>    Way too many pretties for me to keep track of.

1. Backpacking & Rockhounding – Two Hobbies You Should Never Let Meet

http://www.paradiseonpennies.com/simplicity/backpacking-rockhounding-two-hobbies-you-should-never-let-meet/

2. Purple Amethyst Anyone?!

No automatic alt text available.
Amethyst || #Geology
Formula:SiO2
Colour:Violet – purple
Lustre:Vitreous
Amazing Geologist
photo:
Amethyst-GobobosebMts-Namibia
5 x 4 x 4 cm

3.  Aquamarine and Albite

No automatic alt text available.
21 hrs ·
Aquamarine and Albite | #Geology #GeologyPage #Mineral
Locality: Shigar Valley, Skardu District, Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan
Size: 6.8 x 4.1 x 2.6 cm
Photo Copyright © Saphira Minerals

4.  Now let me try some modern video??

5.  I’ll take one of these aquamarines also.  R

Very High quality perfect Aquamarine Crystal from Northern area of Pakistan.
Photo: mine-to-market

6.  Me want one of these rubies.  R

Image may contain: food
Ruby on matrix. Photo by Benjamin DeCamp

7.  A plate of these will do adequately, rubies.

Image may contain: one or more people
Congratulation Geoff Small, this specimen enter this RECORD and thank you for your contribution.
View this wonderful post at Friendship Club of Minerals Museum Singapore.

8.  Go dig in Utah.

My favorite mineral crystal

Image may contain: food
One of the rarest Minerals on earth:
Bixbite (Beryl) From Wah Wah Mountains, Utah.

9.  Realgar, α-As4S4, is an arsenic sulfide mineral, also known as “ruby sulphur” or “ruby of arsenic”.

Realgar-229713.jpg
Realgar Locality: Royal Reward Mine, Green River Gorge, Franklin, King County, Washington, USA (Locality at mindat.org) Size: 2.2 x 1.1 x 0.8 cm. An aesthetic cluster of gemmy, bright, cherry-red realgar crystals nicely attached to a bit of matrix. This piece is from the less well-known Royal Reward Mine of Washington. The specimen probably dates to the 1970s. Ex. Jaime Bird Collection.
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

10.  Real beauties???!!!

Image may contain: Gretchen McDaniel and Randall McDaniel, people smiling, sunglasses, sky, outdoor and nature
Randall and Gretchen McDaniel
August 14, 1976 (42 years)

As my Dad told me, “You sure picked a good one”! R

September 1, 2018 Sweet Wine

September 1, 2018

Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:

More nasty stuff that man kind torments itself with ???

Sugar of Lead: A Deadly Sweetener

Did ancient Romans, Pope Clement II or Ludwig van Beethoven overdose on a sweet salt of lead?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lead(II)_acetate

Uses

Sweetener

Like other lead(II) salts, lead(II) acetate has a sweet taste, which led to its historical use as a sugar substitute. The ancient Romans, who had few sweeteners besides honey, would boil must (grape juice) in lead pots to produce a reduced sugar syrup called defrutum, concentrated again into sapa. This syrup was used to sweeten wine and to sweeten and preserve fruit. It is possible that lead(II) acetate or other lead compounds leaching into the syrup might have caused lead poisoning in those who consumed it.[7] Lead acetate is no longer used in the production of sweeteners because of its recognized toxicity. Modern chemistry can easily detect it, which has almost completely stopped the illegal use that continued decades after legal use as a sweetener was banned.[8]

Historical incidents

The earliest confirmed poisoning by lead acetate was that of Pope Clement II who died in October 1047. A toxicological examination of his remains conducted in the mid-20th century confirmed centuries-old rumors that he had been poisoned with lead sugar.[9] It is not clear if he was assassinated.
In 1787 painter Albert Christoph Dies swallowed, by accident, approximately 3/4 oz (20 g) of lead acetate. His recovery from this poison was slow and incomplete. He lived with illnesses until his death in 1822.[10][11]
Although the use of lead(II) acetate as a sweetener was already illegal at that time, composer Ludwig van Beethoven may have died of lead poisoning caused by wines adulterated with lead acetate (see also Beethoven’s liver).[12][13]
In the 1850s, Mary Seacole applied lead(II) acetate, among other remedies, against an epidemic of cholera in Panama.[14][15]

Cosmetics

Lead(II) acetate, as well as white lead, has been used in cosmetics throughout history.[16]
It is still used in the USA in men’s hair colouring products[17] like Grecian Formula. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration considers this use safe because human testing showed lead did not enter the bloodstream and was not shown to be absorbed.[6] It was, however, banned in cosmetics by Health Canada in 2005 (effective at the end of 2006) based on tests showing possible carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity,[18] and it is also banned in the European Union[18] and has been on the California Proposition 65 warning list as a carcinogen since 1988.[19]

Medical uses

Lead(II) acetate solution was a commonly used folk remedy for sore nipples.[20] In modern medicine, for a time, it was used as an astringent, in the form of Goulard’s Extract, and it has also been used to treat poison ivy.[21]
How did lead poisoning affect the Roman Empire?
When in ancient Rome, don’t drink as the Romans do. High-born Romans sipped beverages cooked in lead vessels and channeled spring water into their homes through lead pipes (pictured). Some historians argue that lead poisoning plagued the Roman elite with diseases such as gout and hastened the empire’s fall.

Lead pipe plumbing for fresh water underneath Rome

Did Lead Poisoning Bring Down Ancient Rome?
Science.  By Thomas Sumner Apr. 21, 2014 , 3:00 PM

Lead Acetate, the First Artificial Sweetener.

“The bellows are burned, the lead is consumed of the fire; the founder melteth in vain: for the wicked are not plucked away. Reprobate silver shall men call them, because the Lord hath rejected them.”
Jeremiah, 6:29-30
Sorry, no pictures of Roman parties (orgies).  Ours are much better.

>    Personal Note.  I quite using Greecian Formula (to darken my graying hair) when I saw that it contained lead.  Any of my eccentricities can probably be blamed on this, makes for a good excuse.  R

Thanks,
Randy/Randall

August 24, 2018, More Pretty Arsenic for our Beauties.

August 24, 2018
In Victorian England and the post-Civil War era in America, the use of heavy metals in cosmetics- such as mercury, arsenic and lead was widespread. The ideal complexion during that era was a pale one that never saw the light of day. Women wore hats and gloves and carried parasols to shield their complexion from the sun’s rays.
However, the manner in which they achieved the pallor or sickly pale look was often through the use of arsenic. Arsenic wafers (which were eaten) were advertised to lighten a woman’s complexion, and was also present in soaps and powders; eye shadows often contained mercury and lead. In addition, large pupils were a desired trait and eyedrops made from the deadly nightshade were used to keep pupils dilated, although its use often lead to blindness. Lead was used directly on the skin through an alum poultrice to treat pimples and other irregularities, which sometimes lead to death.
Toilette by Jules James Rougeron, 1877. In the Victorian era, a pale complexion, clinched waist and large hairdo were the ideal markers of beauty.
All these cosmetic rituals seem preposterous and farcical to us now, but if we examine our own era, beauty in our day and age verge on a similar level of absurd, toxic beauty.
Now, is my woman ready to go out and eat?
Thanks,
Randy

August 24, 2018, White Arsenic

August 24, 2018
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
More nasty stuff that man kind torments itself with, in the name of beauty ???
The United StatesEnvironmental Protection Agency states that all forms of arsenic are a serious risk to human health.[8] The United States’ Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry ranked arsenic as number 1 in its 2001 Priority List of Hazardous Substances at Superfund sites.[9] Arsenic is classified as a Group-A carcinogen.[8]
Extensive arsenic contamination of groundwater has led to widespread arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh[101] and neighboring countries.

In the Victorian era, “arsenic” (“white arsenic” or arsenic trioxide) was mixed with vinegar and chalk and eaten by women to improve the complexion of their faces, making their skin paler to show they did not work in the fields.[46] Arsenic was also rubbed into the faces and arms of women to “improve their complexion”.

Metallic Arsenic.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/7b/Arsen_1a.jpg

Arsen_1.jpg: Original uploader was Tomihahndorf at de.wikipedia derivative work: Materialscientist (talk) Arsen_1.jpg

Native Arsenic.

Aram Dulyan (User:Aramgutang)Own work

Massive native arsenic with quartz and calcite, from Ste. Marie-aux-mines, Alsace, France. Photo taken at the Natural History Museum, London.

Realgar, α-As4S4, is an arsenic sulfide mineral, also known as “ruby sulphur” or “ruby of arsenic”. It is a soft, sectile mineral occurring in monoclinic crystals, or in granular, compact, or powdery form, often in association with the related mineral, orpiment (As2S3).

Realgar-229713.jpg

 

Realgar Locality: Royal Reward Mine, Green River Gorge, Franklin, King County, Washington, USA (Locality at mindat.org) Size: 2.2 x 1.1 x 0.8 cm. An aesthetic cluster of gemmy, bright, cherry-red realgar crystals nicely attached to a bit of matrix. This piece is from the less well-known Royal Reward Mine of Washington. The specimen probably dates to the 1970s. Ex. Jaime Bird Collection.

Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

“Nasty Stuff” !

 

Thanks,

R

August 18, 2018, Coloradoite, Mercury Teluride

August 18, 2018
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:

 

Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch on scenic Shades Mountain, 1,109 feet.
These minerals below can be found all around the world, most of which are used in a variety of different everyday products…. and oh yeah….
They’re also some of the most toxic materials known to science!

1. Coloradoite

1
Coloradoite, also known as mercury telluride, are recently discovered crystalline minerals formed when mercury fuses with tellurium. Since mercury and tellurium are both extremely toxic the combination of the two elements poses a serious risk of poisoning if carelessly handled.

Also, if coloradoite is heated or chemically altered, it can create a deadly vapor that you wouldn’t want to breath into your lungs

Coloradoite, Pyrite, Quartz-338840.jpg
Coloradoite, Pyrite, Quartz Locality: Bessie G Mine, La Plata District (California District), La Plata County, Colorado, USA (Locality at mindat.org) Size: 10.1 x 4.7 x 2.8 cm Coloradoite is a rare mercury telluride named for the type localities which are in Colorado. It is found in hydrothermal, tellurium bearing precious metal veins. Crystals and platelets of grayish-black coloradoite, accented with brassy, microcrystalline pyrite richly cover the sculptural vein matrix of quartz. Very seldom will you see a coloradoite specimen in cabinet size quality and richness.
Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

It is used as a source of telluride metal.

What is the use of tellurium?

Uses. Tellurium improves the machinability of copper and stainless steel, and its addition to lead decreases the corrosive action of sulfuric acid on lead and improves its strength and hardness. Tellurium is used as a basic ingredient in blasting caps, and is added to cast iron for chill control.

Don’t smelt your gold ore on your stove while baking bread.
This one definitely is not very pretty to look at.
Thanks,
R

August 10, 2018, The Tragic Tale of the Radium Girls

August 9, 2018
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
Radium is highly radioactive and its immediate daughter, radon gas, is also radioactive. Exposure to radium, internal or external, can cause cancer and other disorders.

Grace Fryer, One of the first Radium Girls.

The radium industry hadn’t reckoned with the courage and tenacity of the radium girls themselves

1921 magazine advertisement for Undark, a product of the Radium Luminous Material Corporation which was involved in the Radium Girls scandal. Retouched version

The Radium Girls were female factory workers who contracted radiation poisoning from painting watch dials with self-luminous paint.
The women in each facility had been told the paint was harmless, and subsequently ingested deadly amounts of radium after being instructed to “point” their brushes on their lips in order to give them a fine point; some also painted their fingernails, face and teeth with the glowing substance. The women were instructed to point their brushes because using rags, or a water rinse, caused them to waste too much time and waste too much of the material made from powdered radium, gum arabic and water.
From 1917 to 1926, U.S. Radium Corporation, originally called the Radium Luminous Material Corporation, was engaged in the extraction and purification of radium from carnotite ore to produce luminous paints, which were marketed under the brand name “Undark“. The ore was mined from the Paradox Valley in Colorado[2] and other “Undark mines” in Utah.[3] As a defense contractor, U.S. Radium was a major supplier of radioluminescent watches to the military. Their plant in Orange, New Jersey, employed more than a hundred workers, mainly women, to paint radium-lit watch faces and instruments, misleading them that it was safe.
An estimated 4,000 workers were hired by corporations in the U.S. and Canada to paint watch faces with radium.  Many of the workers became sick. It is unknown how many died from exposure to radiation.
The Radium Girls’ saga holds an important place in the history of both the field of health physics and the labor rights movement. Radium paint was still used in dials as late as the 1960s.[13]
01 radium girls RESTRICTED

Radium dial painters working in a factory

“Radium Jaw”.  A case where a dentist went to pull a tooth on one of the girls and a large segment of the jaw came with it.
The Radium Girls were so contaminated that if you stood over their graves today with a Geiger counter, the radiation levels would still cause the needles to jump more than 80 years later.
It is a sad tale that other women suffered from radium hair gel, toothpaste, powders, creams, lotions, lip stick and count less other products.

August 10, 2018, The Tragic Tale of the Radium Girls

August 9, 2018
Greetings from the Bluff Park Back Porch, way up yonder on Shades Mountain (1,109′) in Alabama:
Radium is highly radioactive and its immediate daughter, radon gas, is also radioactive. Exposure to radium, internal or external, can cause cancer and other disorders.

Grace Fryer, One of the first Radium Girls.

The radium industry hadn’t reckoned with the courage and tenacity of the radium girls themselves

1921 magazine advertisement for Undark, a product of the Radium Luminous Material Corporation which was involved in the Radium Girls scandal. Retouched version

The Radium Girls were female factory workers who contracted radiation poisoning from painting watch dials with self-luminous paint.
The women in each facility had been told the paint was harmless, and subsequently ingested deadly amounts of radium after being instructed to “point” their brushes on their lips in order to give them a fine point; some also painted their fingernails, face and teeth with the glowing substance. The women were instructed to point their brushes because using rags, or a water rinse, caused them to waste too much time and waste too much of the material made from powdered radium, gum arabic and water.
From 1917 to 1926, U.S. Radium Corporation, originally called the Radium Luminous Material Corporation, was engaged in the extraction and purification of radium from carnotite ore to produce luminous paints, which were marketed under the brand name “Undark“. The ore was mined from the Paradox Valley in Colorado[2] and other “Undark mines” in Utah.[3] As a defense contractor, U.S. Radium was a major supplier of radioluminescent watches to the military. Their plant in Orange, New Jersey, employed more than a hundred workers, mainly women, to paint radium-lit watch faces and instruments, misleading them that it was safe.
An estimated 4,000 workers were hired by corporations in the U.S. and Canada to paint watch faces with radium.  Many of the workers became sick. It is unknown how many died from exposure to radiation.
The Radium Girls’ saga holds an important place in the history of both the field of health physics and the labor rights movement. Radium paint was still used in dials as late as the 1960s.[13]
01 radium girls RESTRICTED

Radium dial painters working in a factory

“Radium Jaw”.  A case where a dentist went to pull a tooth on one of the girls and a large segment of the jaw came with it.
The Radium Girls were so contaminated that if you stood over their graves today with a Geiger counter, the radiation levels would still cause the needles to jump more than 80 years later.
It is a sad tale that other women suffered from radium hair gel, toothpaste, powders, creams, lotions, lip stick and count less other products.